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Bainton: Concerto fantasia, Golden River Op 16, etc / Daniel, Fingerhut, et al

Album Summary

>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : Pieces (3), for orchestra
>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : Pavane, Idyll and Bacchanal, for string orchestra, with flute & tambourine ad libitum
>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : The Golden River, suite for orchestra (after Ruskin), Op. 16
>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : Concerto fantasia, for piano & orchestra
Performers Conductor Ensemble Composer

Notes & Reviews:

A Stanford-pupil, friend of George Dyson and long-time Principal of Newcastle-upon-Tyne Conservatory, Edgar Bainton emigrated to Australia in 1934, and thus sadly faded from the British music scene. All the works premiered here cover the early part of his creative period, from the early 1900s, prior to his emigration. Completing the repertoire is Bainton's only published orchestral work, the poignantly 'Pavane, Idyll and Bacchanal'.

BBC Music Magazine
Delius with a splash of Eric Coates. Bainton is worth knowing, and is strongly espoused in these premiere recordings by Paul Daniel and the excellent BBC Philharmonic.

Gramophone Magazine
The BBC Philharmonic under the sympathetic baton of Paul Daniel seem to enjoy the experience, and the engineering is as ripe as accommodating as we have come to expect from Chandos.

Gramophone Classical Music Guide
All four works were composed prior to Bainton's permanent move to Australia in 1934, by far the most ambitious being the Concerto fantasia for piano and orchestra which won Bainton his second Carnegie Award. It is cast in four movements, launched by a solo cadenza destined to reappear at salient points throughout the work's half-hour course. Margaret Fingerhut's limpid pianism proves tailor-made for such a gorgeously lyrical, tenderly poetic and subtly integrated offering, which bids farewell in the sunset glow of a somewhat Baxian epilogue.

Bainton himself was the soloist for the 1921 world premiere of the Concerto fantasia in Bournemouth, where it shared a programme with the extremely fetching Three Pieces for Orchestra (1916-20). These grew out of incidental music for two Shakespeare productions in Ruhleben Camp near Berlin, where Bainton was held during the First World War, and are followed here by another most attractive triptych, the Pavane,Idyll and Bacchanal that Bainton wrote in 1924 for amateur groups but which requires a high level of technical expertise.

Unheard for the best part of a century, the four-movement suite The Golden River (1908, but revised four years later) derives its inspiration from a short story by John Ruskin and packs plenty of touching and colourful invention into its 16-minute span.

The BBC Philharmonic under the sympathetic baton of Paul Daniel seem to enjoy the experience. Excellent sound.



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Works Details

>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : Pieces (3), for orchestra
  • Conductor: Paul Daniel
  • Ensemble: BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (09/20/2007-09/21/2007)
  • Running Time: 10 min. 37 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern

>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : Pavane, Idyll and Bacchanal, for string orchestra, with flute & tambourine ad libitum
  • Performer: Richard Davis (Flute)
  • Conductor: Paul Daniel
  • Ensemble: BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (09/20/2007-09/21/2007)
  • Running Time: 9 min. 17 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1924

>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : The Golden River, suite for orchestra (after Ruskin), Op. 16
  • Conductor: Paul Daniel
  • Ensemble: BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (09/20/2007-09/21/2007)
  • Running Time: 16 min. 39 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1908-1912

>Bainton, Edgar Leslie : Concerto fantasia, for piano & orchestra
  • Performer: Margaret Fingerhut (Piano)
  • Conductor: Paul Daniel
  • Ensemble: BBC Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (09/20/2007-09/21/2007)
  • Running Time: 13 min. 16 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1917-1920