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Steve Haines Quintet/Steve Haines: Stickadiboom *

Audio Samples

>Freightrain, The
>Stickadiboom
>Rendezvous
>Sutak 9-1-1
>Patience
>Prospect Park
>Re: Frayne
>Composition 101

Track List

>Freightrain, The
>Stickadiboom
>Rendezvous
>Sutak 9-1-1
>Patience
>Prospect Park
>Re: Frayne
>Composition 101

Album Reviews:

Down Beat (p.63) - 3 stars out of 5 -- "[A] promising quilt of acoustic jazz. Bassist Haines is rapt and focused as a soloist and leader..."

Album Notes

Personnel: Steve Haines (bass instrument); Steve Haines (bass guitar); Robbie Smith , Rob Smith (soprano saxophone, trumpet); David Lown (tenor saxophone); Chip Crawford (piano); Jimmy Cobb , Thomas Taylor (drums).

Audio Mixer: Rob "Wacko" Hunter.

Recording information: Clinton Recording Studios, New York, NY (11/06/2007/11/07/2007).

Author: Wycliffe Gordon.

Not that this gloriously cool and hard swinging bop celebration led by veteran bassist Steve Haines needs any shimmering pedigree to qualify as an instant classic, but a few connections to Miles Davis do bear mentioning. Holding down the rhythm section with Haines and dexterous as ever is 78-year-old Jimmy Cobb, a member of the classic Miles quintet that recorded Kind of Blue; Cobb was on tour in 2009 leading a set of young musicians in a year-long celebration of the seminal album's 50th anniversary. And if that piano at N.Y.C.'s Clinton Studios played both eloquently and aggressively by Chip Crawford, could talk, it might have spun tales of when Bill Evans held court during those classic Davis sessions. It all makes sense considering that Haines directs the Miles Davis Program in Jazz Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. So what does the quirky album title mean? It's the sound Cobb makes as he drives the percussive groove on the hard chugging "The Freighttrain" and pieces like the seductively swaying title track and the quick throbbing "Sutak 9-1-1," both of which feature the wild, blasting trumpet sizzle of Rob Smith. Smith is also the melodic focus on the easier going cuts, the mournful ballad "Patience," and the elegant and sensual "Prospect Park," while the dark "Re: Frayne" includes a thoughtful bass-piano repartee between Crawford and Haines. Cobb makes it historic but the rest of the quintet creates contemporary bop at its best. ~ Jonathan Widran



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