Anouar Brahem (Oud/Composer): The Astounding Eyes of Rita *

Audio Samples

>Lover of Beirut, The
>Dance with Waves
>Stopover at Djibouti
>Astounding Eyes of Rita, The
>Al Birwa
>Galilee Mon Amour
>Waking State
>For No Apparent Reason

Track List

>Lover of Beirut, The
>Dance with Waves
>Stopover at Djibouti
>Astounding Eyes of Rita, The
>Al Birwa
>Galilee Mon Amour
>Waking State
>For No Apparent Reason

Album Remarks & Appraisals:

"In the world of the oud - the fretless, Middle Eastern incarnation of the lute - there are three artists who are moving the instrument - and its centuries-old tradition - forward. Tunisian-born Dhafer Youssef has explored the integration of technology and western classicism on Divine Shadows(Jazzland, 2006), while Lebanese-born Rabih Abou-Khalil has investigated a nexus with horn-driven large ensemble on The Cactus of Knowledge (Enja, 2001). Anouar Brahem, since first emerging on ECM with Barzakh (1991), has explored more nuanced territory, between his longstanding Astrakan Café group and projects like Thimar (ECM, 1998), where Middle Eastern linearity and Western harmony were conjoined, and the chamber setting ofLe Voyage de Sahar (2006), which owed as much to the turning point of European romanticism to contemporary classicism as it did Brahem's undeniable Tunisian roots.

The Astounding Eyes of Rita introduces a new group and a consolidation of past interests. Featuring an international quartet - with two familiar faces to recent ECM fans - its dark, low register-heavy landscape is inherently chamber-like. Still, with an electric bassist and percussionist, this collection of eight Brahem compositions returns to more defined rhythms and vivid Middle Eastern traditionalism, even as it uses group interaction to lend it unmistakable modernity.

Manfred Eicher has often been instrumental in suggesting new groupings of musicians associated with the label; here he creates a truly inspired first-encounter with bassist Björn Meyer and clarinetist Klaus Gesing. Meyer - a key participant in pianist Nik Bartsch's "Zen funk" group Ronin and the remarkable Stoa (2006), pushes Brahem's music with a similarly unshakable pulse on the joyous "For No Apparent Reason" and brooding "The Lover of Beirut," but his touch, overall, is lighter, his support more nuanced. Gesing, last heard on British singer Norma Winstone's sublime Distances (2008), is no less striking here, though by working solely with bass clarinet the result is a beautifully synchronous mesh with the oud's lower register, especially so during the floating melody over the title track's slow groove. Lebanese percussionist Khaled Yassine, introduced to Brahem by the oudist's sister-in-law, rounds out the group and adds subtle drive to the music, especially on the optimistically up-tempo yet still understated "Stopover in Djibouti."

Brahem's improvisational prowess has always been in service of the music; here, his ability to blur the line between form and freedom has reached a new level, egged on, undoubtedly, by his band mates' equal abilities. The music is, by design, about strong melodies and open-mindedness when it comes to expanding on Brahem's core ideas. Gesing, in particular, is a strong foil for Brahem, matching the oudist's ability to evoke with the slightest of bends, the subtlest of glissandi.

It's this very specific combination of musicians that makes Brahem's album so successful. After two discs of sparer chamber music, it's great to hear Brahem back with a pulse; but with Meyer, Gesing, and Yassine as partners, he's retained the elusive mystery of albums like Le Pas du Chat Noir (2002), making The Astounding Eyes of Rita his most aesthetically unified album to date.

"The Astounding Eyes of Rita rings to life on four resonant notes from Tunisian oudist Anouar Brahem, joined in short order by the deep, rich tone of Klaus Gesing's bass clarinet. The music sounds ancient, like something from an old civilization, full of past truths that still hold true.

Manfred Eicher, the man in charge at ECM Records, has been known to inspire, from talented artists, consistently beautiful and sometimes eccentric (American ethno-centricity speaking) music from unusual instrumental combinations. His ECM sound - with notable exceptions including Keith Jarrett's Standard Trio and Trio Beyond, to name two - leans toward spaciousness and subtlety with an egalitarian chamber music approach. The Astounding Eyes of Rita fits into that chamber aesthetic, its quartet teaming German bass clarinetist Gesing with Brahem's Middle Eastern oud, backed by Swedish bassist Bjorn Meyer - known best for his groove-heavy Zen-Funk work in Nik Bartsch's Ronin - and Lebanese percussionist Khaled Yassine, to make a tranquil world music that embraces the inspired introspection and organic breathing room that has become de rigueur with the German record label.

The oud, the ancestor to the Western lute, is not your everyday jazz instrument. The pear-shaped, big-bodied string instrument that, to the uneducated ear, doesn't sound hugely different from the acoustic guitar, is sharper in tone, perhaps, and more succinct in its notations. The bass clarinet adds a Western element; introduced to many by Bennie Maupin's dark wood moaning within the sonic conglomeration of Miles Davis' Bitch's Brew (Columbia, 1969), its divine sound, showcased here in a quartet setting, is too seldom heard in jazz. The darbouka - a Middle-Eastern goblet drum with a crisp, resonant pop - bolsters the world music flavor of the set.

"The Lover of Beirut" has a peaceful feeling - restrained, unhurried and spiritual. "Dance With Waves" gives off a glow of peaceful momentum, while "Stopover At Djibouti" evokes images of teaming streets, gregarious interactions and convivial equanimity, the richly mellifluous voice of the bass clarinet punctuated by the concise declarations of the oud and darbouka.

The title tune explores the mysteries and the beauty of "Rita's" eyes, sounding like a celebration of something holy. Indeed, the quartet's musical immersion in things revered gives The Astounding Eyes of Rita a feeling of deep spirituality expressed by these serenely gorgeous sounds." -AllAboutJazz

Album Reviews:

Down Beat (p.80) - 3 stars out of 5 -- "The music takes its time and unfolds on its own schedule, even embracing silence and stillness."

JazzTimes (p.50) - "Cultures caress rather than clash here, thanks mostly to the centralizing force of Brahem's fluid and sensitive touch on his instrument..."

Album Notes

Personnel: Anouar Brahem (oud); Klaus Gesing (bass clarinet).



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