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Factor orbis - Sacred Vocal Music of the Renaissance - Victoria, Lassus, Obrecht, Byrd, etc / Singer Pur

Album Summary

>Victoria, Tomás Luis de : O Domine Jesu Christe
>Lassus, Orlando de : In monte Oliveti
>Obrecht, Jacob : Factor orbis
>Byrd, William : Liber primus sacrarum cantionum
>Gesualdo, Carlo : Miserere mei, Deus
Performers Ensemble Composers

Notes & Reviews:

"This music must be sung with precision and Singer Pur consistently delivers the goods with performances that are highly musical and technically polished. Take these madrigals in small servings because they are rich indeed, but the rewards are enormous. If there is any justice this recording will catapult this ensemble to greater recognition" -Vespers1610.com



Reviews

A little know ensemble will open your ears
Here’s a real sleeper, a thirteen year old recording of Renaissance polyphony by Singer Pur, a German mixed voice ensemble comprised of singers who received their training as choristers at Regensburg Cathedral. The group’s name roughly translates to “singers neat” and I agree, I think they are pretty neat (although the name actually refers to clean vocal tone). The ensemble has put together an interesting program of sacred music that spans the early to late Renaissance. Many of the usual suspects are here: Josquin, Lassus, Victoria and Byrd. But it’s the lesser-known composers who provide added value to this very well sung recording. I’ve sampled many recordings of polyphony over the years and must admit that I don’t recall ever encountering the music of Alexander Utendal (c. 1530/40-1581), Conrad Rupsch (c. 1475-1530) or Raniequin de Mol (late 15th century). From the first notes of Victoria’s O Domine Jesu Christe that opens the recording, I was impressed by the ensemble’s smooth tonal quality (neat indeed). While they don’t have the bright top notes that marked the early recordings of the Tallis Scholars, they possess a beautifully blended sound with a firm bottom. There are some wonderful stand-outs: Verbum caro factum est, an expansive six-part Christmas motet by Senfl and Gallus’s Viri Sancti, a beautifully crafted double choir work. The works by the lesser-known composers I’ve mentioned before are all quite good. While there are some moments of rhythmic slackness, in Byrd’s In resurrectione tua for example, but not enough to spoil things. There is something of a sonic haze over the recording that sometimes blurs individual voices but the overall production values are quite good with full texts and translations accompanying some decent liner notes.
Submitted on 08/29/09 by Craig Zeichner 
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Works Details

>Tomás Luis de Victoria (1548 - 1611) : O Domine Jesu Christe
  • Performers: Thomas Bauer (Bass); Caroline Höglund (Soprano); Marcus Schmidl (Bass); Christian Wegmann (Tenor); Klaus Wenk (Tenor); Markus Zapp (Tenor)
  • Ensemble: Singer Pur
  • Period Time: Renaissance
  • Form: Choral

>Lassus, Orlando de : In monte Oliveti
  • Performers: Thomas Bauer (Bass); Caroline Höglund (Soprano); Marcus Schmidl (Bass); Christian Wegmann (Tenor); Klaus Wenk (Tenor); Markus Zapp (Tenor)
  • Ensemble: Singer Pur
  • Period Time: Renaissance
  • Form: Choral
  • Written: by 1568

>Obrecht, Jacob : Factor orbis
  • Performers: Thomas Bauer (Bass); Caroline Höglund (Soprano); Marcus Schmidl (Bass); Christian Wegmann (Tenor); Klaus Wenk (Tenor); Markus Zapp (Tenor)
  • Ensemble: Singer Pur
  • Period Time: Renaissance
  • Form: Choral

>Byrd, William : Liber primus sacrarum cantionum :: In resurrectione tua
  • Performers: Thomas Bauer (Bass); Caroline Höglund (Soprano); Marcus Schmidl (Bass); Christian Wegmann (Tenor); Klaus Wenk (Tenor); Markus Zapp (Tenor)
  • Ensemble: Singer Pur
  • Period Time: Renaissance
  • Form: Choral

>Gesualdo, Carlo : Miserere mei, Deus
  • Performers: Thomas Bauer (Bass); Caroline Höglund (Soprano); Marcus Schmidl (Bass); Christian Wegmann (Tenor); Klaus Wenk (Tenor); Markus Zapp (Tenor)
  • Ensemble: Singer Pur
  • Period Time: Renaissance
  • Form: Choral
  • Written: by 1611