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Khachaturian: Cello Concerto; Concerto Rhapsody

> Cello Concerto in E minor - I. Allegro moderato
> Cello Concerto in E minor - II. Andante sostenuto -
> Cello Concerto in E minor - III. Allegro [a battuta]
> Concerto-Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra - Concerto-Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra

Album Summary

>Khachaturian, Aram : Concerto for Cello in E minor
>Khachaturian, Aram : Concert-Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra
Performer Conductor Ensemble
  • >
Composer

Notes & Reviews:

The Naxos series devoted to the orchestral music of Aram Khachaturian continues with his two works for cello and orchestra. The 'Cello Concerto', whose brooding emotional unease did not endear it to the authorities at a difficult time for Soviet musicians, is the most resourceful and forward-looking of his works from this period. The 'Concerto-Rhapsody' is dedicated to Mstislav Rostropovich and pursues a highly personal and intuitive approach to the relationship between soloist and orchestra.

"Boomy, colorful, Chandos-like sound with the soloist closely miked. It's a lot like the forward, aggressive, almost forced sound the Russians seemed to favor in the 60's and 70's- perhaps not surprising since this recording originates from the current Russian radio and television company. The ear adjusts to the sound after a bit and begins to hear a wonderfully fervent account of Khachaturian's moody cello concerto, played with throaty, solid tone by Yablonsky and ably supported by Fedotov. Soloist and conductor correctly convey the sound work of Khachaturian's concerto as more sensuous, duskier, less high-strung than Shostakovich's, while still eliciting an emotional depth that emphasizes an affinity between the two works."-ARG

"Exotic rhythms, exuberant and unmistakably Georgian folk melodies, woodwind solos filled with longing, passionate writing for the primary soloist, and an immediately appealing orchestral palette - lovers of Khachaturian's classic Violin Concerto will recognize in his Cello Concerto all the elements that make this composer a 20th century favorite. The work for cello and orchestra is not as well-known as its counterpart, but that is an injustice which this new recording attempts to counteract. Dmitry Yablonsky is the excellent soloist, and his account makes it clear that a potential audience favorite has been withheld from the standard repertoire for too long...

This new recording featuring Dmitry Yablonsky is, then, the finest available performance of the Khachaturian Cello Concerto, and as such merits the strongest possible recommendation. If the Concerto-Rhapsody does not always reach the same level of inspiration, Yablonsky's playing is still breathtaking. These are recordings which any fan of Khachaturian would delight to have, and which should commend a richly enjoyable but long-forgotten concerto to a much wider audience. Rich, clear sound completes the package." -MusicWeb International

Gramophone Magazine
Yablonsky serves the work well. His unforced tone has a natural presence and penetration, and he's able to rise, seemingly with little effort, to an impressive, full intensity at climactic moments...The orchestra plays the quicker music with verve, and in the score's darker episodes...creates a powerful, sombre atmosphere.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Studio 5, Russian State TV & Radio Company KULTURA, Mos (10/20/2007-10/25/2007).



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Works Details

>Khachaturian, Aram : Concerto for Cello in E minor
  • Performer: Dmitry Yablonsky (Cello)
  • Conductor: Maxim Fedotov
  • Notes: Studio 5, Russian State TV & Radio Company KULTURA, Moscow, Russia (10/20/2007-10/25/2007)
  • Running Time: 32 min. 3 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 1946

>Khachaturian, Aram : Concert-Rhapsody for Cello and Orchestra
  • Performer: Dmitry Yablonsky (Cello)
  • Conductor: Maxim Fedotov
  • Notes: Studio 5, Russian State TV & Radio Company KULTURA, Moscow, Russia (10/20/2007-10/25/2007)
  • Running Time: 24 min. 24 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1963