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Henry Thomas (Guitar/Vocals): Texas Worried Blues: Complete Recorded Works 1927-1929

Audio Samples

>Fishin' Blues
>Old Country Stomp
>Charmin' Betsy
>Lovin' Babe
>Railroadin' Some
>Don't Leave Me Here
>Little Red Caboose, The
>Bob McKinney
>Honey, Won't You Allow Me One More Chance?
>Run, Mollie, Run
>Shanty Blues
>Woodhouse Blues
>John Henry
>Cottonfield Blues
>Arkansas
>Fox and the Hounds, The
>Red River Blues
>Jonah in the Wilderness
>When the Train Comes Along
>Bull Doze Blues
>Don't Ease Me In
>Texas Easy Street
>Texas Worried Blues

Track List

>Fishin' Blues
>Old Country Stomp
>Charmin' Betsy
>Lovin' Babe
>Railroadin' Some
>Don't Leave Me Here
>Little Red Caboose, The
>Bob McKinney
>Honey, Won't You Allow Me One More Chance?
>Run, Mollie, Run
>Shanty Blues
>Woodhouse Blues
>John Henry
>Cottonfield Blues
>Arkansas
>Fox and the Hounds, The
>Red River Blues
>Jonah in the Wilderness
>When the Train Comes Along
>Bull Doze Blues
>Don't Ease Me In
>Texas Easy Street
>Texas Worried Blues

Album Notes

Personnel: Henry Thomas (vocals, guitar).

Liner Note Author: Stephen Calt.

These recordings, dating between 1927 and 1929, are a unique body of work: work songs, minstrel numbers, rags, and what we now define as the blues, all offered in an unpretentious form that would have been every bit as compelling had Henry Thomas cut them this way 40 years later. Songs such as "Arkansas," "Fox and the Hounds" (featuring the reed pipes that Thomas also excelled at playing), and "Little Red Caboose" represent a brand of upbeat dance music associated with late-19th century entertainment, a tradition already largely lost or becoming lost when Thomas cut these numbers. Yet Thomas, who was already in his 50s when he recorded these tracks, sings and plays them with a beguiling ease and honesty, not to mention a dexterity on the guitar that makes him sound every bit as vital and urgent as Big Bill Broonzy or any of the other up-and-coming blues legends just starting out at the time these sides were laid down. The blues numbers, including "Shanty Blues," "Woodhouse Blues," "Honey, Won't You Allow Me One More Chance?," and "Bull Doze Blues" are compelling in their own right -- they display musical and lyrical virtuosity and, in the latter two cases, offer a chance to hear the sources for classic works by Bob Dylan and Canned Heat, respectively. Luckily for historians, Henry Thomas recorded for Vocalion and not for one of the truly lost labels like Paramount, and all 23 surviving sides of his work sound very good on this CD. ~ Bruce Eder



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