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Spanish Harlem Orchestra: Viva La Tradición *

Audio Samples

>La Salsa Dura
>Mi Herencia Latina
>Son De Corazon
>Como Baila Mi Mulata
>Si Me Quieres Te Quiero
>Baila Latino
>La Fiesta Empezo
>Nuestra Cancion
>Linda
>Regalo De Dios
>Rumba Urbana
>El Negro Tiene Tumbao

Track List

>La Salsa Dura
>Mi Herencia Latina
>Son De Corazon
>Como Baila Mi Mulata
>Si Me Quieres Te Quiero
>Baila Latino
>La Fiesta Empezo
>Nuestra Cancion
>Linda
>Regalo De Dios
>Rumba Urbana
>El Negro Tiene Tumbao

Album Reviews:

JazzTimes (p.57) - "Any way you listen, VIVA LA TRADICION is about getting on the dance floor, and fans of classic, expertly played and arranged salsa will love it."

Album Notes

Personnel: Marcos Bermudez, Ray de la Paz (vocals, background vocals); Carlos Cascante (vocals); Mitch Frohman (flute, saxophone); Hector Colon (trumpet); Jimmy Bosch, Daniel Reagan (trombone); Oscar Hernandez (piano); George Delgado (congas, percussion); Jorge Gonzalez (bongos, percussion); Luisito Quintero (timbales, percussion); Willie Torres (background vocals).

Audio Mixers: Dave Kowalski; Oscar Hernandez.

Recording information: Bennett Studios, Englewood, NJ.

Illustrator: Gary Eisenberg.

Spanish Harlem Orchestra's fourth album, and its first in four years, puts the focus back on the group itself after previous albums with spotlights for Paul Simon and Rubén Blades, among others. Fittingly, it celebrates the rich tradition of salsa music, as heard on the second track, "Mi Herencia Latina," written by vocalist Willie Torres, who name-checks a parade of influences. (Torres knows something about salsa tradition: he's been part of the chorus for some of the best salseros going back to the early '60s, including Palmieri brothers Eddie and Charlie, Ray Barretto, Tito Puente, and Celia Cruz, among others.) As usual, Oscar Hernández produces, writes, and arranges most of the tracks, and translating his vision falls to a group of standout instrumentalists: brass players led by trombonist Jimmy Bosch and trumpeter Hector Colón, Mitch Frohman on woodwinds, and percussionists Luisito Quintero (timbales), George Delgado (congas), and Jorge Gonzalez (bongos). The material includes everything a fan would expect: plenty of strong, durable salsa numbers, plus son and mixing it up in the middle, the bright and buoyant pachanga "Como Baila Mi Mulata" (another original composition and arrangement by Hernández, led by Frohman on flute). ~ John Bush



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