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Dvorák: Slavonic Dances, Opp. 46 & 72 / Iván Fischer

Audio Samples

>Dvorak, Antonin : Slavonic Dances (8) for Orchestra, Op. 46/B 83
>Dvorak, Antonin : Slavonic Dances (8) for orchestra, B. 147 (Op. 72)

Album Summary

>Dvorak, Antonin : Slavonic Dances (8) for Orchestra, Op. 46/B 83
>Dvorak, Antonin : Slavonic Dances (8) for orchestra, B. 147 (Op. 72)
Conductor Ensemble
  • >
Composer

Notes & Reviews:

In these sixteen highly varied and colorful dances, Dvorak offers stylized, even idealized dance fantasias that intermingle folk elements with his own inspired melodies so effectively, so disarmingly and so artistically that for the most part they have defied attempts by musicologists to uncover the folk sources. Whereas the first set had featured predominantly Czech dances, the second set of Dvorak's 'Slavonic Dances' is more broadly Slavonic, incorporating Slovak, Polish, Serbian and Russian elements in addition to Dvorak's favorite melancholy dumka strains. A reissue of Ivan Fischer's original recording for Philips, this SACD makes a welcome return to the active catalogue.

'Whereas the first set had featured predominantly Czech dances (with the exception of the second which evoked the Ukranian dumka - not, strictly speaking, a dance), the second set is more broadly Slavonic, incorporating Slovak, Polish, Serbian and Russian elements in addition to Dvorák's favourite melancholy dumka strains. In these sixteen highly varied and colourful dances, Dvorák had fulfilled his original brief to perfection, creating stylised, even idealised dance fantasias which inter - mingle folk elements with his own inspired melodies so effectively, so disarmingly and so artistically that for the most part they have defied attempts by musicologists to uncover the folk sources. Dvorák justified his approach in 1894: From the rich stores of Slavonic folk music, in its Hungarian [i.e. Slovak], Russian, Bohemian and Polish varieties, the composers of the day have derived, and will continue to derive, much that is charming and novel in their music. Nor is there anything objectionable in this, for if the poet and painter base much of their best art on national legends, songs and traditions, why should not the musicians?'

Iván Fischer is founder and Music Director of the Budapest Festival Orchestra and Principal Conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra of Washington D.C. The partnership between Iván Fischer and his Budapest Festival Orchestra has proved to be one of the greatest success stories in the past 25 years of classical music. Fischer introduced several reforms, developed intense rehearsal methods for the musicians, emphasizing chamber music and creative work for each orchestra member. Intense international touring and a series of acclaimed recordings for Philips Classics, later for Channel Classics have contributed to Iván Fischer's reputation as one of the world's most visionary and successful orchestra leaders.

"It is not suprising that the conductor and orchestra who made the two best recordings of the Brahms Hungarian Dances should give us the best Slavonic Dances. The playing is full-throated and accurate. Strings are rich, and soloists have lots of personality. Nothing is tentative; the rhythms seem spring, and the music really flows. Nor is it suprising that the Czech Philharmonic plays few of these more persuasively; they have practically owned the music for more than a century. What is suprising is how much better most of these sound in Budapest. This is a great recording."-American Record Guide

"Every phrase breathes: little is left to chance; detail is glorious in both performance and recording and the colours shine through Fischer's translucent textures...Fischer finds profundity as well as élan." -Classic FM Magazine ****

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Italian Institute, Budapest (03/1999/05/1999).



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Works Details

>Antonin Dvorák (1841 - 1904) : Slavonic Dances (8) for Orchestra, Op. 46/B 83
  • Conductor: Iván Fischer
  • Running Time: 34 min. 33 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic

>Antonin Dvorák (1841 - 1904) : Slavonic Dances (8) for orchestra, B. 147 (Op. 72)
  • Conductor: Iván Fischer
  • Running Time: 33 min. 46 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic