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Rossini: Ermione / Carmen Giannattasio, Patricia Bardon, Paul Nilon, Loïc Félix

Audio Samples

>Rossini, Gioachino : Ermione, opera

Album Summary

>Rossini, Gioachino : Ermione, opera
Conductor Ensemble Composer

Notes & Reviews:

During the years from 1815 to 1822 when his career centered on Naples, Rossini composed a sequence of works for the Teatro San Carlo, which at that time boasted an outstanding orchestra and a company of resident singers that was the leading ensemble available anywhere. A string of masterpieces resulted, including Ermione - which is without doubt one of the composer’s greatest operas, despite it being perhaps the least immediately successful. Ermione was received with incomprehension at its sole performance in 1819 and was never revived in Rossini’s lifetime. Since its fi rst stage revival in Pesaro in 1987, Ermione has been recognized as a lost masterpiece. Set in the aftermath of the Trojan War, the opera’s novelties begin with an overture interrupted by a choral lament of Trojan prisoners. Tension and staggering originality are maintained right to the very end.

"Parry’s conducting is taut yet singer- (and woodwind-solo) friendly and unfailingly dramatic. The standoffs between Carmen Giannattasio’s Ermione, Paul Nilon’s Pirro and Patricia Bardon’s Andromaca bristle with theatrical temperament. Giannattasio is occasionally raw, but thrilling, while Colin Lee (Oreste) and Bardon show you don’t have to be Italian to shine in this music." -The Sunday Times

"All [three tenors] thrive when sparring with Carmen Giannattasio’s Ermione – a performance of temperament and style, not least in her hair-raising finale, where she combines the thrilling range of a Sutherland and the dramatic intelligence of a classical tragédienne. Her Italianate sensibility is all the more precious in a cast dominated by Anglophone singers." -The Financial Times

"The new recording runs at white heat whenever Colin Lee's Orestes is on stage. This is a fierce and brilliantly realised portrait of the erotically obsessed and emotionally unstable fall guy...Pilade is sung with comparable mastery of the role by Bülent Bezdüz, a model of comprimario playing...a notable achievement, purposeful and bold, and the documentation is first-rate." -Gramophone

"[Giannattasio's] is an Ermione whose mental disintegration is almost visible...[She] does not hold back, so the potency of the confrontation is fearsome and gripping...Bardon brings the warmth of tone and, easy, flowing vocal production that suit the Trojan queen's behaviour and she deals with Rossinian floridity as adroitly as do her colleagues." -International Record Review

"There's a spaciousness to David Parry's conducting and the London Philharmonic Orchestra finds ominous foreboding and sumptuous colours. Add to that some soloists who really know what makes this music bubble with simmering angst, and you have a very attractive package indeed." -Classic FM

"Paul Nilon's suavely vainglorious Pirro is pitted against Colin Lee's electrifying, altogether more volatile Oreste. Patricia Bardon makes much of Andromaca's implacably moral nobility, while David Parry's edgy, hard-driven conducting is admirably suited to the work's nerve-ridden atmosphere." -The Guardian

Sunday Times
Parry's conducting is taut yet singer- (and woodwind-solo) friendly and unfailingly dramatic. The standoffs between Carmen Giannattasio's Ermione, Paul Nilon's Pirro and Patricia Bardon's Andromaca bristle with theatrical temperament. Giannattasio is occasionally raw, but thrilling, while Colin Lee (Oreste) and Bardon show you don't have to be Italian to shine in this music.

Financial Times
All [three tenors] thrive when sparring with Carmen Giannattasio's Ermione - a performance of temperament and style, not least in her hair-raising finale, where she combines the thrilling range of a Sutherland and the dramatic intelligence of a classical tragédienne. Her Italianate sensibility is all the more precious in a cast dominated by Anglophone singers.

Classic FM Magazine
There's a spaciousness to David Parry's conducting and the London Philharmonic Orchestra finds ominous foreboding and sumptuous colours. Add to that some soloists who really know what makes this music bubble with simmering angst, and you have a very attractive package indeed.

The Guardian
Paul Nilon's suavely vainglorious Pirro is pitted against Colin Lee's electrifying, altogether more volatile Oreste. Patricia Bardon makes much of Andromaca's implacably moral nobility, while David Parry's edgy, hard-driven conducting is admirably suited to the work's nerve-ridden atmosphere.

BBC Music Magazine
In her recitatives Giannattasio has something of the limpid lyricism of the young Sutherland...Paul Nilon, who is quite simply singing better and better, is by turns a tyrannical and sympathetic Pirro...Parry expertly leads the LPO through this fine piece as if they had been playuing it all their professional lives.

Gramophone Magazine
The new recording runs at white heat whenever Colin Lee's Orestes is on stage. This is a fierce and brilliantly realised portrait of the erotically obsessed and emotionally unstable fall guy...Pilade is sung with comparable mastery of the role by Bülent Bezdüz, a model of comprimario playing...a notable achievement, purposeful and bold, and the documentation is first-rate.

International Record Review
[Giannattasio's] is an Ermione whose mental disintegration is almost visible...[She] does not hold back, so the potency of the confrontation is fearsome and gripping...Bardon brings the warmth of tone and, easy, flowing vocal production that suit the Trojan queen's behaviour and she deals with Rossinian floridity as adroitly as do her colleagues.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Henry Wood Hall, London (03/2009).



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Works Details

>Rossini, Gioachino : Ermione, opera
  • Conductor: David Parry
  • Ensemble: London Philharmonic Orchestra
  • Running Time: 106 min. 14 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Form: Opera/Operetta
  • Written: 1819