1 800 222 6872

Ke$ha: Cannibal

Audio Samples

>Cannibal
>We R Who We R
>Sleazy
>Blow
>Harold Song, The
>Crazy Beautiful Life
>Grow a Pear
>C U Next Tuesday
>Animal [Billboard Remix] - (remix)

Track List

>Cannibal
>We R Who We R
>Sleazy
>Blow
>Harold Song, The
>Crazy Beautiful Life
>Grow a Pear
>C U Next Tuesday
>Animal [Billboard Remix] - (remix)

Album Remarks & Appraisals:

Cannibal is the first extended play (EP) by American recording artist Kesha, released on November 19, 2010. The EP is a follow up companion to her previous record, Animal. Originally the record was set to only be released as a deluxe edition of Animal, but was instead sold and released as both an EP and a deluxe edition of Animal. Kesha worked with a variety of producers and writers such as Dr. Luke as the executive producer, Benny Blanco, Ammo, Max Martin, Bangladesh and others. Musically, the songs on Cannibal are of the dance-popgenre while incorporating elements of electro and electropop in its production and beats.

Critical reception of the album has been generally positive. A common complaint amongst critics was the overuse of auto-Tune mainly criticizing that it was unneeded and the albums ballads were commonly listed as the album's standout tracks. A dispute amongst critics was the albums lyrical value. Some critics felt that they were vain and rude while others complimented Kesha for her authentic and unapologetic lyrical delivery. In the United States, Cannibal reached a peak of fifteen selling 74,000 copies in its first week of release. In Canada, the album achieved similar success reaching a peak of fourteen on the chart.

"Ke$ha is back with a nine-track EP. Cannibal is a follow-up companion to the electro-pop star's previous album, Animal and is scheduled for an official release date of November 19, 2010. Can Cannibal live up to the success of its predecessor? Probably not. But it is a strong adjunct to Animal, with its relatively solid line-up, catchy dance beats, and positive message that fans are sure to eat up.

According to the one-and-only Kesha Sebert in an interview with MTV's James Montgomery, "the songs on Cannibal were made to inspire people to ignore any hate or judgment and be themselves unapologetically. It's the perfect companion to Animal, and I hope you guys like it. And if you don't like it, bite me." Well said, Ke$ha." - Suite101

"When I read the jokey title of "Grow a Pear," one of the songs on Ke$ha's new EP, Cannibal, I laughed out loud - and then instantly felt like a hypocrite. After all, I'd admonished Katy Perry for similar swipes at would-be suitors' masculinity. Then, after hearing the song's utterly ridiculous lyrics, I realized the difference: Perry sheepishly, some might say cynically, skirts outright offensiveness by thinly veiling her homophobia and misogyny in more palatable, PG-rated portions, serving them with a vapid pout and her tits pushed up to her chin. Perry is a good Christian girl trying to make a buck (or a whore pretending to be a good Christian girl - but whatever); Ke$ha, on the other hand, is authentic, unapologetic trash (sometimes literally: She wore a trashbag to the VMAs). Also, she uses the word "mangina."

Of course, Ke$ha Ro$e $ebert isn't any more talented than Katy Hudson Brand, and her songs aren't any catchier. Most of the tracks on Cannibal are "sung" atop a similar video-game synth with all the precision of a malfunctioning GPS system. And though "Sleazy" was produced by Bangladesh (Lil Wayne's "A Milli") and co-written by Teddybears's Klaus Ahlund (the man behind most of Robyn's Body Talk project), Ke$ha doesn't branch out in any significant way here, so it's unlikely to do for her what the similarly packaged The Fame Monster did for Lady Gaga. That said, her bona fides on the infectious lead single "We R Who We R," a purported response to the recent gay teen suicides she calls an anthem for "weirdos," and the stuttery club track "Blow" are undeniable.

Putting a dollar sign in your name is a great way to guarantee that you'll probably never be taken seriously, but everyone knows that the girl who does the most body shots at the party, who goes down on the most guys under the bleachers, is usually the one crying the hardest the next morning. "I have a heart, I swear I do," Ke$ha rap-sings on "Cannibal," a song about a guy who's "up [her] anus," but based on most of the singles from her debut, you'd never know she had a brain, let alone a circulatory system. One of the non-singles with "heart" is the title track fromAnimal, which is reprised here as "Animal (Billboard Remix)" (no, not a reference to Ke$ha's dominance on the Hot 100 this year, but the name of the producer); in both its original and remixed form, the final song on both the LP and the EP is the promise of something deeper, something beyond Dr. Luke's latest recycled formula. So if Katy Perry is the cocktease who leaves you with a peck on the cheek at the end of the night, Ke$ha at least gives you a happy ending." - SlantMagazine

"The killjoys who dismissed Ke$ha's debut Animal as one-dimensional party-girl trash will make hay with her new EPCannibal, assuming they're still paying attention. Over the course of eight new songs - in the '80s, this would've been called an "album" - Ke$ha details the precise order in which she'll devour an unfortunate male's body parts, at one point comparing herself to Jeffrey Dahmer. (Too soon!) She threatens, "You don't wanna mess with us / Got Jesus on my neck-a-lace," a glittery Crusader. Thanks to the infamous "Grow a Pear", an emasculation of some poor guy who chose talking over sex, Cannibal is likely the first Top 40 album to use the word "mangina". Even the sweet kiss-off "C U Next Tuesday" will never get the Radio Disney play it deserves, because Radio Disney programmers know how to spell.

Give her this: K's a far more convincing man-man-maneater than Neko Case. Neko's got more powerful lungs, but she also sounds more amenable to reason, and more predictable. With Neko, you know you're gonna get carefully crafted songs, well-sung and thoughtful. With Ke$ha, you might get a passable straightforward pop vocal, but that tends to be her least interesting mode. ("The Harold Song" is the only one here that sounds "faceless", a favorite insult of the killjoys.) More likely, she'll start rapping, or rap-singing, or one of her highly-paid henchmen will transform her voice into something you've never heard before. Once this stuff starts happening, all bets are off. Ke$ha obviously doesn't care whether you like the way she's singing - or at least, she goes to great lengths to create that impression - and this sociopathic Dahmer quality makes her one of the most exciting singers around.

"Cannibal" opens the EP with a blank-eyed rap, delivered almost in monotone, and then explodes into a chorus of at least three different Auto-Tuned voice effects. During the second verse Ke$ha breaks out her party-girl voice. Now, this voice is plainly an act. When K speaks in an interview, she sounds like a normal Midwesterner - some lazy Valley vowels aside, she could be a nightly news anchor. In song, she lays down a calculated mix of diphthongs, growly Midwestern "errrrr"s, and even some southern tics; so the phrase "stir my tea" comes out "sterr mah teeeeeeah". If there's a guiding principle to her cobbled "accent", it seems to be "sound as improper as possible". This back-and-forth, between unrefined Eliza Doolittle impropriety and blatant computer manipulation, would justify a couple online theses. Above all, it's Ke$ha's way of selling her transgressive pop-music niche.

But wait! We haven't even touched on the coolest vocal effect in "Cannibal", where K's wordless yodel stretches into a woozy vibrato. The EP's martial synth beats often sound like producers Dr. Luke and Benny Blanco are going through the motions, but they continue to splatter their singer with novel vocal effects; she's their favorite Auto-Tune canvas. Their best tune is "Grow a Pear", whose cute little melody ties together K's insults like some castrating gift bow.

Also great is "Sleazy", K's M.I.A. move - she disses "bougie friends" - with a booming beat courtesy producer Bangladesh (Lil' Wayne's "A Milli"). Rappin' Ke$ha rattles off a well-constructed string of rapid-fire syllables; rap's still not her steez, but you can tell she works hard at it. And Scritti Politti vet David Gamson, who produced two of the least characteristic (and best) songs onAnimal, is back for "C U". Nothing earthshaking happens to K's voice on this song, but its light throwback vibe is a great way to end the album - at least, if you turn it off before the boring Billboard remix of "Animal". Which you will.

When K presents herself as a party girl, she's a specific party girl. She's vivacious and self-aware and kind of mean, unmistakably Ke$ha. Her one attempt at a serious breakup song, that stupid "Harold Song", fails not because she can't do three dimensions, but because it's a dull song and she sings it like Katy Perry. But through most of Cannibal, she does the maneater thing as convincingly as PJ Harvey, Gillette, or Anthony Hopkins." - PopMatters

Album Reviews:

Billboard (p.24) - "The Cali-bred Ke$ha's tonsils go full tilt on 'Cannibal,' riding a wave of synthesizers, electro grooves and club beats as she dishes out disses."

Album Notes

Audio Mixers: Serban Ghenea; John Hanes .

Available as a standalone EP and as part of a deluxe reissue of her debut album, Animal, Kesha's Cannibal is a nine-song release with hitmaker Dr. Luke returning as executive producer. Besides remixes and outtakes, the EP features the single "We R Who We R," a song Kesha wrote in response to the recent rash of teenage suicides.



Reviews

There are currently no reviews, be the first one!
Login or Create an Account to write a review