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Robbie Robertson: How to Become Clairvoyant [Digipak]

Audio Samples

>Straight Down the Line
>When the Night Was Young
>He Don't Live Here No More
>Right Mistake, The
>This Is Where I Get Off
>Fear of Falling
>She's Not Mine
>Madame X
>Axman
>Won't Be Back
>How to Become Clairvoyant
>Tango for Django

Track List

>Straight Down the Line
>When the Night Was Young
>He Don't Live Here No More
>Right Mistake, The
>This Is Where I Get Off
>Fear of Falling
>She's Not Mine
>Madame X
>Axman
>Won't Be Back
>How to Become Clairvoyant
>Tango for Django

Album Remarks & Appraisals:

"The result is an album that tells a personal, at times even autobiographical, story set to the type of sonically rich soundtrack that we have come to expect from Robbie Robertson's solo work. But, for the first time, we get a glimpse inside the man that, for nearly the past forty-five years, has written some of popular music's most important songs. I guess it's true that good things come to those who wait." -NPR

"It’s his best solo album since his first one 24 years ago and as the temperature starts to rise as we head inch from spring to summer, his provocatively languid tunes provide the perfect accompaniment." -HitFix.com

"'When the Night Was Young' combines Sixties idealism and voodoo grind with memories of back roads and juke-joint gigs, when his old group was still the Hawks. It is fitting that Eric Clapton, who once aspired to join the Band, sings and plays on half of this record. His and Robertson's grizzled vocals and pointillist guitar exchanges in "The Right Mistake" and "Fear of Falling" (the latter with throaty bolts of organ by Steve Winwood) are sublime roughage, the sound of two men with shared roots still moving forward." -Rolling Stone

Album Reviews:

Rolling Stone (p.75) - 4 stars out of 5 -- "'When the Night Was Young' combines Sixties idealism and voodoo grind with memories of back roads and juke-joint gigs..."

Rolling Stone (p.69) - Ranked #10 in Rolling Stone's '50 Best Albums Of 2011' -- "[A] seamless marriage of innovation and tradition."

Billboard (p.28) - "The set is an enveloping mix of melody, mood and texture that speaks to Robertson's triple-threat virtues as a performer, composer and producer..."

Paste (magazine) - "[With] a wonderful back-handed keyboard vamp in 'When The Night Was Young'..."

Record Collector (magazine) (p.97) - 4 stars out of 5 - "There are telling contributions from Eric Clapton, Steve Winwood and Trent Reznor, but it's the subdued voice of Robertson himself that plainly gives the record its momentum..."

Album Notes

Personnel: Robbie Robertson (vocals); Angela McCluskey (vocals); Eric Clapton (guitar, background vocals); Robert Randolph (pedal steel guitar); Martin Pradler (Wurlitzer piano); Ian Thomas (drums); Jimi Englund (percussion); Jason Boshoff, Matt Robertson, Eldad Guetta, Marius de Vries (programming); Daryl Johnson, Rocco Deluca (background vocals).

Recording information: Olympic Studios; The Strongroom; The Village.

Photographers: Charles P. M. Mitchell ; David Jordan Williams; Stephanie Romanov Wechler; Nimi Ponnudurai; Alan Douglas; Anton Corbijn; Robbie Robertson.

How to Become Clairvoyant is Robbie Robertson's first album since Contact from the Underworld of Redboy in 1998. The new album was co-produced by Robertson and Marius de Vries (Massive Attack, Björk, and Rufus Wainwright), and recorded over two years in London and Los Angeles. (There was a long break in the sessions when Robertson answered director Martin Scorsese's call to work on the music for the film Shutter Island.) Robertson wrote eight of the album's 12 tunes, co-wrote three with Eric Clapton (who appears numerous times on both guitar and vocals) and one with de Vries. There's an all star musician's guest list that includes Steve Winwood, Trent Reznor, Robert Randolph, Tom Morello, and Angela McLuskey. Robertson's backing band includes bassist Pino Palladino, drummer Ian Thomas, pianist Martin Pradler, and backing vocalists Angelyna Boyd, Daryl Johnson, and Rocco Deluca. The album's first single, "He Don't Live Here Anymore," a song about addiction, was released to radio on January 29.



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