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Rutter: Gloria; Magnificat; Te Deum

Album Summary

>Rutter, John : Gloria
>Rutter, John : Magnificat for soprano, chorus & orchestra
>Rutter, John : Te Deum for chorus, organ & orchestra
Performer Conductor Ensemble Composer

Notes & Reviews:

"The three works heard on this recording span a period of just over fifteen years, from 1974 to 1990. All three are festive and celebratory in character, composed for joyful occasions, and all three use the resources of voices and instruments together." - John Rutter Acclaimed British composer John Rutter's Gloria was a milestone in his career and remains a favorite with choirs worldwide for its freshness, drama and sheer beauty. His joyous setting of the Magnificat was conceived, in the composer's words, as "a bright Latin-flavored fiesta" and is performed here in its version for choir, organ and chamber orchestra. This delightful choral album concludes with Rutter's setting of the Te Deum, one of the church's most ebullient hymns of praise to the Almighty.

"His festive settings of the Gloria, Magnificat and Te Deum were written over the period 1974-1990. These vivid performances show how thoroughly Rutter can absorb them and make music of exhilarating impact." -The Telegraph

"The performances are generally very fine--no question as to these singers' familiarity with and appreciation for Rutter's music. And it's hard not to get caught up in the overall excitement--Rutter ideally captures the festive, celebratory nature of these texts while offering plenty of his signature melodies, catchy rhythmic structures, and vibrant orchestration, involving powerfully expressive brass, percussion, and organ in the Gloria and Te Deum... If you're a Rutter collector, you will want this for the Magnificat and Te Deum." -ClassicsToday

American Record Guide
The Gloria is given a deft performance that's a bit too small and careful to rival Rutter's own. But the delightful Magnificat is as good as any. Cleobury (EMI) did it well but this is better; lighter, brighter, and more sumptuously recorded. The 'Esurientes', which might be the loveliest Rutter interlude of all, is sung gorgeously by soprano Elizabeth Cragg. (Cleobury used a choirboy, with predictably pale results.) Here the work is heard in the composer's scaled-down version for choir, organ, and chamber orchestra. If the jacket hadn't mentioned it, I wouldn't have noticed. (Or cared, for that matter.) The 8-minute Te Deum also goes well. Here's hoping these folks get a crack at Rutter's Requiem with the same engineering crew in tow. English and Latin texts are supplied. For the Magnificat, exit Cleobury and enter Lucas.

Gramophone
Although best known for his many carols and anthems, John Rutter is equally adept at handling music on a larger canvas. His reflective Requiem (now 25 years old) is an established classic. Much the same can be said of the evergreen 1974 setting of the Gloria, Rutter's first major overseas commission. Its incisive, punchy, syncopated brass opening lingers memorably, setting the scene for some spectacular, polished and vibrant singing. The notoriously taxing finale is accomplished without a wobble, resulting in a deeply satisfying performance.

The Buffalo News
A few years ago, on a nasty night, Buffalo's Ars Nova Musicians performed Rutter's 40-minute-long Magnificat at St Joseph's Cathedral and when it ended, a woman in front of me turned around. "Well," she said, "that was sure worth coming out here for." With his fanfares, timpani, soaring vocals and jingly excitement, Rutter does give you your money's worth. ... it's a lot of fun - a beaming, bright-timbred expression of faith. The Choirs of St Albans Cathedral, operating out of an old Benedictine abbey dissolved by Henry VIII, sing the music with light-hearted grace.

MusicWeb International
There are several fine recordings in the catalogue, not least that of Gloria, Te Deum and shorter works on Hyperion CDA67259. Classicsonline already offer Rutter's own recording of the Gloria on his own Collegium label but the new recording, alert to all aspects of Rutter's music, can look these predecessors in the eye. Strongly recommended: any recording that could keep me listening intently while the neighbours noisily power-hosed their patio for most of its duration must be beyond praise.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Cathedral and Abbey Church of St. Alban, St. Albans, He.



Reviews

Performed by choirs, soloist, organist, and conductor of St. Albans Cathedral, England
John Rutter has captured the admiration of many school and church choirs with his modern settings of religious texts. His compositions have improved the image of English music that is easily understood and performed by amateur choirs. These three works call for choir and soloists, instruments less than full orchestra, and traditional Latin texts, all within the skill level of school/choir singers and performers. The first two works were commissions from U.S. organizations, and the Te Deum a request from a British guild. Comments from performers and audiences alike invariably reflect the joyous exuberance woven into these songs of praise. The setting of St. Alban’s Cathedral just north of London and the beautiful and ancient history of this pre-Roman site provide a welcoming embrace for Mr. Rutter’s accomplishments. It is as if he is returning home. The very best about this recording is the skill of the performers. The St. Albans Abbey Girls Choir and the St. Albans Cathedral Choir of boys keep an energetic pace, Elizabeth Cragg’s beautiful soprano soars above the choir, and the organ and instruments of the Ensemble DeChorum provide substance and texture. There is much unison singing, and there are numerous time changes throughout, but these do not distract the audience during the performance. The listener perceives airiness, lightness, ethereal shimmering, and joy. The pace and lightness of the voices reflect the intent of the composer for the expression of simplicity, participation, traditional texts, and joyous worship.
Submitted on 06/06/11 by howsweetthesound 
"Feel good" sacred music
For over 30 years, John Rutter has been one of the most popular of English composers; though probably most famous for his Christmas carols—both original and arranged—he has also written longer works of sacred music, three of which are found here. (The Requiem and “Mass of the Children” have already been recorded by Naxos, with different artists.) As these are concert pieces, rather than liturgical, the composer has some fun with various musical styles (I love the Elgar-like “big tune” at the end of the Te Deum), infectious rhythms and colorful harmonies, and that fun comes across in the performances, too. Most other recordings are by a mixed chorus, so to hear the boys and girls voices on the top line adds a slightly different color. The sound is good, even if the tenors get buried under the instruments a few times. Notes by the composer, and texts.
Submitted on 06/09/11 by Jim D. 
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Works Details

>Rutter, John : Gloria
  • Performer: Tom Winpenny (Organ)
  • Conductor: Andrew Lucas
  • Ensemble: Ensemble DeChorum
  • Notes: Cathedral and Abbey Church of St. Alban, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, UK (07/16/2010-07/17/2010)
  • Running Time: 5 min. 29 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Form: Choral
  • Written: 1974

>Rutter, John : Magnificat for soprano, chorus & orchestra
  • Performer: Tom Winpenny (Organ)
  • Conductor: Andrew Lucas
  • Ensemble: Ensemble DeChorum
  • Notes: Cathedral and Abbey Church of St. Alban, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, UK (07/13/2010-07/14/2010)
  • Running Time: 38 min. 39 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Form: Choral
  • Written: 1990

>Rutter, John : Te Deum for chorus, organ & orchestra
  • Performer: Tom Winpenny (Organ)
  • Conductor: Andrew Lucas
  • Ensemble: Ensemble DeChorum
  • Notes: Cathedral and Abbey Church of St. Alban, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, UK (07/16/2010-07/17/2010)
  • Running Time: 7 min. 49 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 1988