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Teizo Matsumura: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 2; To the Night of Gethsemane / Ikuyo Kamiya, piano

Album Summary

>Matsumura, Teizo : Symphony no 1
>Matsumura, Teizo : Symphony no 2, for piano & orchestra
>Matsumura, Teizo : To the Night of Gethsemane, for chamber orchestra
Performer Conductor Ensemble Composer

Notes & Reviews:

A contemporary of Toru Takemitsu, Teizo Matsumura combined European influences with Asian musical traditions. His tautly-constructed Symphony No. 1, a work of genuine power and intense sonic splendour, evokes the image of innumerable locusts swarming over the earth. Symphony No. 2, written over 30 years later and inspired by a poster of a pair of sumo-wrestler-like statues standing at the entrance to a famous Buddhist temple in Nara, Japan, is a soulful monologue of alternating sorrow and hope. The richly expressive symphonic poem To the Night of Gethsemane, inspired by Giotto's fresco The Kiss of Judas, was Matsumura's last orchestral work.

Takuo Yuasa is currently Associate Professor of the Performing Arts Centre, Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, where he is closely associated with the Geidai Philharmonia. He has a successful recording career as an exclusive Naxos artist.

Ritmo
It's pleasantly surprising that Naxos edition is devoted to the music of composers S. Japanese XX. Over the years, and a surprising number of authors, I can hardly find moles on the issue, and no longer appear real surprises level. As can be the case Teizo Matsumura (1929-007), the author closely linked in its formative stage leader (spiritual and media) of their group, Toru Takemitsu. With musical foundations similar to this (use of forms, instruments and Western traditions, combined with elements of Eastern music), Matsumura builds two symphonies of great emotional power, and full of poetic sound. In almost 40 years apart, they might be works of different authors, but more as the result of a different imaginary, that as a result of a conscious resignation and creative elements used in the past. The two pieces are stunning and full Matsumara that sound west / east, for the ears on this side of the world, never ceases to amaze.

MusicWeb International
The reliably excellent RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra give a necessarily virtuosic, masculine performance, as they have done many times before for Naxos. They are masterfully conducted by Takuo Yuasa, who has quite a record already with different orchestras performing Japanese music on Naxos...

Infodad.com
Here, sorrow and hope coexist and alternate, each taking the place of the other for a time, only to return to the background as the other emotion comes equally strongly to the front. The blending of Buddhist and Christian feelings and emphases in Matsumura's work allows a mixing of emotions as well, with hopefulness and something akin to despair - but not quite despairing - coexisting and periodically giving way to each other.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: National Concert Hall, Dublin, Ireland (09/18/2006-09/19/2006).



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Works Details

>Matsumura, Teizo : Symphony no 1
  • Conductor: Takuo Yuasa
  • Ensemble: RTE National Symphony Orchestra
  • Notes: National Concert Hall, Dublin, Ireland (09/18/2006-09/19/2006)
  • Running Time: 24 min. 8 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1965

>Matsumura, Teizo : Symphony no 2, for piano & orchestra
  • Performer: Ikuya Kamiya (Piano)
  • Conductor: Takuo Yuasa
  • Ensemble: RTE National Symphony Orchestra
  • Notes: National Concert Hall, Dublin, Ireland (09/18/2006-09/19/2006)
  • Running Time: 21 min. 59 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1998

>Matsumura, Teizo : To the Night of Gethsemane, for chamber orchestra
  • Conductor: Takuo Yuasa
  • Ensemble: RTE National Symphony Orchestra
  • Notes: National Concert Hall, Dublin, Ireland (09/18/2006-09/19/2006)
  • Running Time: 13 min. 56 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 2002