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Florencia Ruiz: Luz de la Noche [Light of the Night] [Digipak] *

Audio Samples

>Alumbraremos [We'll Enlighten]
>Estuve Asi [I Was That Way]
>No Está [It Isn't]
>Por Ahí [Maybe]
>Hacia el Final [Towards the End]
>¡Que Pena! [What a Pity!]
>Todo Dolor [All Pain]
>Nada de Vos [Nothing From You]
>Invierno [Winter]
>Condición [A Condition], Una
>Perpetuo [The Perpetual], Lo
>Niñez [Childhood]
>Futuro, Flor [The Future, Flor], El
>Luz de la Noche [Light of the Night]

Track List

>Alumbraremos [We'll Enlighten]
>Estuve Asi [I Was That Way]
>No Está [It Isn't]
>Por Ahí [Maybe]
>Hacia el Final [Towards the End]
>¡Que Pena! [What a Pity!]
>Todo Dolor [All Pain]
>Nada de Vos [Nothing From You]
>Invierno [Winter]
>Condición [A Condition], Una
>Perpetuo [The Perpetual], Lo
>Niñez [Childhood]
>Futuro, Flor [The Future, Flor], El
>Luz de la Noche [Light of the Night]

Album Notes

Adapter: Maria Camillo.

Audio Mixer: Facundo Rodriguez .

Recording information: Estudio Jupiter, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil (01/2010-12/2010); Fort Music, Buenos Aires, Argentina (01/2010-12/2010); Pez's Studio, Buenos Aires, Argentina (01/2010-12/2010).

Director: Carlos Villavicencio.

Photographers: Sebastián Arpesella; Román Tkachuk; Julián Carschemboim; Vicky Schwindt.

Arranger: Carlos Villavicencio.

Renowned on the international music scene since the early 2000s, ethereal-voiced Argentine vocalist Florencia Ruiz made her U.S. debut with this hypnotic, richly textured collection, whose powerful emotional dynamics are driven by matching her exquisite Spanish vocals to a swirl of jazz, new age, classical, orchestral, and worldbeat influences. Luz de la Noche (Light of the Night) is comprised of mostly short, several-minute thematic pieces that translate in English to such concepts as "We'll Enlighten" (the dramatic, sweeping opener "Albumbraremos"), "It Isn't" (the contemplative "No Está"), "Maybe" (the graceful vocal-acoustic guitar-violin trio "Por Ahi"), "Winter" ("Invierno," a haunting Enya-like trip through the season), and "Childhood" (the folk-classical meditation "Niñez"). The singer also gives her wider audience a glimpse of where she's headed creatively by calling the next-to-last track "El Futuro, Flor" ("The Future, Flor"), which fluctuates between classical dreaminess and booming percussion, horn, and electric guitar-fired sections. Ruiz's wild eclecticism might not appeal to purists who think Latin singers should focus on their indigenous music -- but she makes a compelling case for following a joyfully schizophrenic muse. ~ Jonathan Widran



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