Mendelssohn, Schumann: Violin Concertos / Christian Tetzlaff, violin

> Phantasie in C major, Op. 131 - Phantasie in C major, Op. 131
> Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 - I. Allegro molto appassionato -
> Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 - II. Andante -
> Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 - III. Allegretto non troppo - Allegro molto vivace
> Violin Concerto in D minor, WoO 23 - I. In kraftigem, nicht zu schnellem Tempo
> Violin Concerto in D minor, WoO 23 - II. Langsam
> Violin Concerto in D minor, WoO 23 - III. Lebhaft doch nicht schnell

Album Summary

>Schumann, Robert : Fantasie for Violin and Orchestra in C major, Op. 131
>Mendelssohn, Felix : Concerto for Violin in D minor
>Schumann, Robert : Concerto for Violin in D minor
Performer Conductor Ensemble Composers

Notes & Reviews:

Germany's star violinist Tetzlaff performs the virtuoso Romantic concertos of Mendelssohn and Schumann. The Mendelssohn Concerto is one of the most frequently performed violin concertos of all time, with an unfailing popularity among audiences. Schumann's last significant composition, the long-lost Violin Concerto saw its première in 1937, and was hailed by Menuhin as the "historically missing link of the violin literature."

"Christian Tetzlaff is an absolutely fabulous violinist, and this repertoire suits him perfectly. His tone is unfailingly sweet, penetrating, and lyrical, but never burdened with excessive vibrato. His intonation is as accurate as we have any right to expect, his phrasing of the big tunes always natural and unaffected... Tetzlaff plays with evident affection, making light of the difficult and often unforgiving solo parts, while Paavo Järvi does everything that he possibly can with Schumann's accompaniments. Superb engineering, ideally balanced, puts the finishing touch on an irresistible release."-Classics Today (10/10)

American Record Guide
Tetzlaff has a remarkable technique and a sometimes audacious approach to phrasing that adds a bit of extra spice to the Mendelssohn and supports the unusual nature of the solo material of both Schumann pieces. What impresses me most about the Schumann concerto is the relationship between the sometimes athletic solo line and an exquisite orchestration that reflects the tonal qualities of the violin's warmest registers. What impresses me the most about this concert recording... is the conductor's ability to make the work as much a piece for orchestra as it is for violin.

Gramophone
A particularly clear recording, with finely balanced orchestral textures and distinguished solo woodwind playing, helps make this one of the most impressive accounts of the work available. Tetzlaff [is]... a wonderfully expressive player, projecting a keen sense of the Andante's long melodic lines... Tetzlaff shows an admirable lightness of touch, and the wistful character of the opening is well caught. ... the Concerto... remains a fine performance: Tetzlaff takes us right to the intimate heart of the slow movement, after which the pure, luminous D major sonorities of the finale make a particularly stirring effect.

The WholeNote
The Mendelssohn is a beautiful performance, never over-played, with an affecting slow movement and a finale that displays detailed, subtle and sensitive playing without ever losing a sense of line... Tetzlaff... does a lovely job with this work, as he does with the Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra... It was originally felt to be a brilliant and cheerful piece...

ClassicsToday.com
The couplings are perfectly chosen and even more impressive, if possible. Schumann's two clumsily orchestrated concertante works for violin and orchestra are full of beautiful ideas, but they so often bog down in what can seem like tiresome repetition. Not here. Tetzlaff plays with evident affection, making light of the difficult and often unforgiving solo parts... Superb engineering, ideally balanced, puts the finishing touch on an irresistible release.

BBC Music Magazine
Tetzlaff uses quite a bit of rubato in the opening [of the Mendelssohn], giving a few moments of doubtful ensemble...But he shapes dynamics and phrases sensitively, and the slow movement is less febrile and more poised...Tetzlaff treats [the Fantasy] with affection and virtuosity in turn. In the [Schumann] concerto, Jarvi's powerful delivery of the dramatic introduction grabs the attention, as does Tetzlaff's first entry.

Gramophone Magazine
If I describe the Mendelssohn performance as meticulous, this is not to suggest a lack of spontaneity or awareness of the broader picture but rather a situation in which a determination to follow the composer's instructions has led to an account of unusual depth and subtlety...Tetzlaff takes us right to the intimate heart of the [Schumann] slow movement.

International Record Review
Tetzlaff and Jarvi are as one, the 'give and take' being almost as chamber music, writ large. It is also a wholly Romantic performance [of the Mendelssohn], a yielding choice of tempos that permit flexibility without losing sight of the underlying forward momentum...This uncommonly interesting CD is well worth the attention of the genuine lover of echt-Romantic repertoire.

The Guardian
[Tetzlaff] brings both urgency and a compelling sense of purpose to the violin writing, so that its weaknesses, its sometimes blunt phrasing and routine figuration, are entirely transcended. It's a remarkable piece of musical alchemy, but then his way of presenting the Mendelssohn concerto as if it were a new discovery is exceptional, too.

Daily Telegraph (UK)
Christian Tetzlaff is a supreme advocate of the music's characteristic mixture of bravura and sensitive lyricism. The performance of the Mendelssohn concerto is a pure delight.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Frankfurt, Alte Oper.



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Works Details

>Schumann, Robert : Fantasie for Violin and Orchestra in C major, Op. 131
  • Performer: Christian Tetzlaff (Violin)
  • Conductor: Järvi Paavo
  • Ensemble: Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  • Running Time: 13 min. 23 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1853

>Mendelssohn, Felix : Concerto for Violin in D minor
  • Performer: Christian Tetzlaff (Violin)
  • Conductor: Järvi Paavo
  • Ensemble: Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  • Running Time: 26 min. 28 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 09/16/1844

>Schumann, Robert : Concerto for Violin in D minor
  • Performer: Christian Tetzlaff (Violin)
  • Conductor: Järvi Paavo
  • Ensemble: Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra
  • Running Time: 29 min. 10 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 1853