1 800 222 6872

John Pizzarelli: Double Exposure

Audio Samples

>I Feel Fine/Sidewinder
>Harvest Moon
>Traffic Jam/The Kicker
>Ruby Baby
>Alison
>Rosalinda's Eyes
>In Memory of Elizabeth Reed
>Drunk on the Moon/Lush Life
>Walk Between the Raindrops
>Free Man in Paris
>Take a Lot of Pictures
>I Can Let Go Now
>Diamond Girl

Track List

>I Feel Fine/Sidewinder
>Harvest Moon
>Traffic Jam/The Kicker
>Ruby Baby
>Alison
>Rosalinda's Eyes
>In Memory of Elizabeth Reed
>Drunk on the Moon/Lush Life
>Walk Between the Raindrops
>Free Man in Paris
>Take a Lot of Pictures
>I Can Let Go Now
>Diamond Girl

Album Remarks & Appraisals:

For Nearly 30 years, guitarist John Pizzarelli has explored various comers of the jazz landscape and merged a variety of styles into a single, distinctive signature sound. On any given recording - indeed, in any given song - one is likely to encounter an entertaining convergence of jazz, swing, the American songbook, pop, bossa nova and more.

Double Exposure, Pizzarelli's latest recording on Telarc - a division of Concord Music Group - focuses on two distinct styles to make a single fine recording. Set for release on May 15, 2012. Double Exposure is a collection of tunes by some of the great pop songwriters of his own generation that are framed squarely within traditional jazz arrangements.

The result is a fascinating and engaging musical hybrid. Double Exposure draws from a diverse pool of some fo the best pop songwriters of the past five decades: Lennon and McCartney, Neil Young, James Taylor, Leiber and Stoller, Tom Waits, Joni Mitchell and others. Woven into these memorable compositions are threads of jazz borrowed from figures like Wes Montgomery, Billy Strayhorn, Than Jones and John Coltrane.

Pizzarelli is backed by his touring and studio band, featuring keyboardist Larry Fuller, bassist (and brother) Martin Pizzarelli and drummer Tony Tedesco. In addition, organist Larry Golding assists on a number of tracks. A four-piece horn section arranged by Don Sebesky includes Tony Kadleck, John Mosca, Kenny Berger and Andy Fusco, providing accents and embellishments along the way.

The Guardian
This will come as a surprise to everyone who had John Pizzarelli tagged as a latter-day swing crooner who also plays some tasty guitar. Born in 1960, he is, in fact, a second-generation jazz guitarist, his father being the great Bucky P. This is a collection of 13 songs from his own generation, all given surprising new treatments. The Beatles meet Lee Morgan, Tom Waits meets Billy Strayhorn, James Taylor meets Joe Henderson and they both meet Lambert, Hendricks and Ross. The arrangements are sharp and witty, the singing deceptively easygoing, and the guitar playing just terrific. It's a delight.

The Boston Globe
John Pizzarelli, the tasteful guitarist and singer who unfortunately is best known for a Foxwoods commercial, has come up with something innovative for his latest album, "Double Exposure." Most of the 13 songs are either jazz redos of rock songs or ­ get this - mashups of jazz and pop tunes. He sets the melody and lyrics of the Beatles' "I Feel Fine" against the chords and horn punch of Lee Morgan's classic, "The Sidewinder." He uses the challenging chord changes of Billy Strayhorn's "Lush Life" as the backdrop for Tom Waits's "Drunk on the Moon." He underpins Seals & Crofts's "Diamond Girl" with the familiar chords from Miles Davis's "So What." He blends James Taylor's "Traffic Jam" and Joe Henderson's hard bop number "The Kicker" right into each other, so that the parts become inseparable. Shockingly, it all works - quite well. If you like Pizzarelli, you'll enjoy this immensely. If, however, you find his voice too thin and nasally, then "Double Exposure" won't win you over.

The CD Universe
The album title refers to the fact that the program takes classic pop songs and puts them in jazz settings: thus you'll hear a cool bossa nova arrangement of Joni Mitchell's "Free Man in Paris," a completely natural lounge-lizard setting of Tom Waits' "Drunk on the Moon," and a hard-swinging, boppish version of James Taylor's "Traffic Jam" that sounds like it was written for the Manhattan Transfer and incorporates the Joe Henderson composition "The Kicker." There's nothing particularly revolutionary about this idea: the line separating pop music and jazz has always been fuzzy anyway, and many jazz standards are actually show tunes. But Pizzarelli is an unusually gifted arranger as well as a drop-dead wonderful guitarist, and on several of these arrangements he suggests entirely new ways of thinking about these familiar songs. Consider, for example, his subtly elegant use of organ and violin on Neil Young's "Harvest Moon," or the way he sneaks material from Wes Montgomery's "Four on Six" into a snappy rendition of the Allman Brothers' instrumental "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed." It's also true that Pizzarelli is not gifted with a conventionally beautiful voice. He is, however, an excellent singer: listen the how he makes the most of what he's got on his voice-and-guitar bossa nova setting of Billy Joel's "Rosalinda's Eyes." What's charming about this album, beyond the sheer quality of the songs and the arrangements, is Pizzarelli's obvious and genuine love for this really broad gamut of material, and his insight into the varied qualities that make them all great songs.

Community Voices
John Pizzarelli's Double Exposure album comes out next week. 12 of the 13 tracks are classic pop and rock tunes from the 60's to the 80's. I interviewed him recently and we talked about the album, what he wanted to do and how he did it. In addition to some country commentary, regarding reality shows, I'll have a preview piece on Glen Campbell in next Thursday's Weekend Magazine. He's appearing at the Byham on the 20th.

Second Hand Songs
John Pizzarelli, a world-renowned American jazz guitarist and vocalist, merges a variety of styles, ranging from jazz, swing, the American songbook, pop to bossa nova, into a distinctive signature sound.

Wall Street Journal
On his album "Double Exposure" (Telarc), out this week, singer-guitarist John Pizzarelli, at the risk of offending purists, mixes riffs, chords and harmonies from jazz and pop standards into single tracks. For instance, he puts together Wes Montgomery's "Four on Six" and the Allman Brothers Band's "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed." The tricky Montgomery intro pushes Mr. Pizzarelli and his combo to cover "Reed" at a breakneck pace. The new take swings in much the manner of Mr. Pizzarelli's usual repertoire: He's probably today's most notable proponent of swinging '40s and '50s jazz.

Album Notes

Personnel: John Pizzarelli (vocals, 7-string guitar, classical guitar); Aaron Weinstein (violin); Andy Fusco (clarinet, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone); Kenny Berger (bass clarinet, baritone saxophone); Tony Kadleck (trumpet, flugelhorn); John Mosca (trombone, euphonium); Larry Fuller (piano, electric piano); Larry Goldings (organ); Tony Tedesco (drums).

Audio Mixers: Bill Moss ; John Pizzarelli.

Liner Note Author: John Pizzarelli.

Recording information: Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville, NY (2011).

On this album, jazz guitarist and singer John Pizzarelli pays simultaneous tribute to the pop music of his adolescence (Steely Dan, Billy Joel, the Allman Brothers, Elvis Costello) and the jazz tradition in which he, as a member of the celebrated Pizzarelli dynasty, was steeped from his earliest years. The album title refers to the fact that the program takes classic pop songs and puts them in jazz settings: thus you'll hear a cool bossa nova arrangement of Joni Mitchell's "Free Man in Paris," a completely natural lounge-lizard setting of Tom Waits' "Drunk on the Moon," and a hard-swinging, boppish version of James Taylor's "Traffic Jam" that sounds like it was written for the Manhattan Transfer and incorporates the Joe Henderson composition "The Kicker." There's nothing particularly revolutionary about this idea: the line separating pop music and jazz has always been fuzzy anyway, and many jazz standards are actually show tunes. But Pizzarelli is an unusually gifted arranger as well as a drop-dead wonderful guitarist, and on several of these arrangements he suggests entirely new ways of thinking about these familiar songs. Consider, for example, his subtly elegant use of organ and violin on Neil Young's "Harvest Moon," or the way he sneaks material from Wes Montgomery's "Four on Six" into a snappy rendition of the Allman Brothers' instrumental "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed." It's also true that Pizzarelli is not gifted with a conventionally beautiful voice. He is, however, an excellent singer: listen the how he makes the most of what he's got on his voice-and-guitar bossa nova setting of Billy Joel's "Rosalinda's Eyes." What's charming about this album, beyond the sheer quality of the songs and the arrangements, is Pizzarelli's obvious and genuine love for this really broad gamut of material, and his insight into the varied qualities that make them all great songs. ~ Rick Anderson



Reviews

There are currently no reviews, be the first one!
Login or Create an Account to write a review