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Robert Hood: Motor: Nighttime World, Vol. 3 [Digipak] *

Track List

>Exodos, The
>Motor City
>Better Life
>Wheel, The
>Black Technician
>Learning
>Drive (The Age of Automation)
>Torque One
>Hate Transmissions
>Slow Motion Katrina
>Assembly
>Time to Rebuild, A

Album Reviews:

Q (Magazine) (p.101) - 4 stars out of 5 -- "Melancholy, unsentimental yet not without optimism, this is music full of intrigue and depth."

Album Notes

Robert Hood's first two Nighttime World albums were released in 1995 and 2000. Inspired by a viewing of Julien Temple's 2010 BBC documentary Requiem for Detroit?, the producer continues the series 12 years later. As a 1965-born Motor City native who has spent the past several years living in rural Alabama (he still has family in his hometown), Hood's perspective is uniquely connected yet recently distanced. Motor: Nighttime World, Vol. 3 therefore might not be a Detroit techno album in the strictest sense, but those who know Hood's background wouldn't need to see the album's cover or track titles to feel a link. Less challenging -- neither as fractured nor as rigid -- compared to 2010's Omega and 2011's Omega: Alive, this is some of the most moving, skillfully crafted, and detailed music Hood has released. "Black Technician," alternately sleek and scuffed-up, works sinister burbling, cranky mallets, and automobile sound effects. Driving/throbbing and stately, "Torque One" recalls Manuel Göttsching's Detroit techno touchstone E2-E4. The acid-laced "Motor City" and "Hate Transmissions" churn and thrill with no release. Most of the ambient-leaning material, including "Slow Motion Katrina" (dancing thumb piano and contemplative piano amid fluttering swan-dive noises) and "The Wheel" (oddly graceful, despite its stasis), dazzles darkly and pensively. In terms of emotive, wide-scoped Detroit techno, this is somewhere between the Detroit Escalator Co.'s Soundtrack (313) and Carl Craig's More Songs About Food and Revolutionary Art. Its curves are more elegant than those of either antecedent. No small achievement for someone well into his second decade of making music. ~ Andy Kellman



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