Bruno Walter Early New York Recordings - Mahler: Symphonies nos 1 & 2 / Nadine Conner, Mona Paulee (rec. 1942)

> Audience's noise - Audience's noise
> Symphony No. 2 in C minor, "Resurrection" - II. Andante moderato
> Symphony No. 2 in C minor, "Resurrection" - III. In ruhig fliessender Bewegung
> Symphony No. 2 in C minor, "Resurrection" - IV. Urlicht: Sehr feierlich, aber schlicht
> Symphony No. 2 in C minor, "Resurrection" - V. Im Tempo des Scherzo: Im Tempo des Scherzo's - Wild herausfahren
> Symphony No. 2 in C minor, "Resurrection" - V. Im Tempo des Scherzo: Langsam - Misterioso
> Applause - Applause

Album Summary

>Mahler, Gustav : Symphony no 1 in D major "Titan"
>Sound, Recorded : Applause
>Mahler, Gustav : Symphony no 2 in C minor "Resurrection"
>Sound, Recorded : Silence
Conductor Ensembles Composers

Notes & Reviews:

The Philharmonic-Symphony of 1942 was going through a bit of a rough patch at the height of WWII, with numerous players called up for military service. Still the players respond well and vividly to Walter's wishes, in this account of the "Resurrection" that is noticeably more rhetorical and dramatic than his several later recordings. It is tempting to speculate that the Walter's recent uprooting from both his German homeland and his adopted Vienna refuge, combined with the traumatic events of Pearl Harbor just a month before this concert, may have manifested themselves in a certain ferocity evident in this account of the "Resurrection." Walter's missionary zeal for Mahler's multidimensional music provided a ready outlet for such a vivid response to world events.

Gramophone Magazine, December 2012
Hetoric and searing drama charge the first movement with unprecedented levels of intensity...As to the closing minutes, no performance in my experience quite equals them for a sense of unbridled exhilaration, the Westminster Choir singing their hearts out like no other on disc. It'll likely move you to tears and I have no hesitation whatever in naming this the pre-eminent 'historic' Mahler Second.

Sunday Times, 26th August 2012
The notion that Bruno Walter's Mahler was "soft-centred" used to be a commonplace of English criticism...These [performances], previously unissued and taken from broadcasts from Carnegie Hall, New York, in 1942, confirm that his approach was anything but soft. They bristle with fierce energy and whiplash playing. No 1 is particularly impressive.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Carnegie Hall (01/25/1942/10/25/1942).



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Works Details

>Mahler, Gustav : Symphony no 1 in D major "Titan"
  • Conductor: Bruno Walter
  • Ensemble: New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
  • Running Time: 49 min. 40 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: ?/?1884-03/1888

>Sound, Recorded : Applause
  • Conductor: Bruno Walter
  • Ensemble: Westminster Choir
  • Period Time: Contemporary

>Mahler, Gustav : Symphony no 2 in C minor "Resurrection"
  • Conductor: Bruno Walter
  • Running Time: 47 min. 39 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1888-1894

>Sound, Recorded : Silence
  • Period Time: Contemporary

>Mahler, Gustav : Symphony no 2 in C minor "Resurrection"
  • Conductor: Bruno Walter
  • Running Time: 47 min. 39 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1888-1894

>Sound, Recorded : Applause
  • Period Time: Contemporary