Georg Schumann: Symphony in B minor; Serenade, Op. 34 / Christoph Gedschold, Muenchner Rundfunkorchester

Album Summary

>Schumann, Georg : Symphony in B minor
>Schumann, Georg : Serenade for large orchestra, Op. 34
Conductor Ensembles Composer

Notes & Reviews:

CPO's 1st CD featuring symphonic works by Georg Schumann, who for many years was the director of the Sing-Akademie in Berlin and a professor of composition at the Prussian Academy of the Arts. Today he is being rediscovered as a late romanticist, but during his lifetime he was regarded as a new romanticist.

American Record Guide, March / April 2013
The symphony is quite conservative, seemingly untouched by Wagner's shenanigans. It is well constructed, tuneful, youthful, and happy; and there's nothing wrong with that at all. 'Ständchen' is an elegant slow movement with a healthy clarinet solo - and here are some Wagnerian touches: the Tristan chord has borne some fruit. The Finale is a tarantella, and I wish Schumann had written more like this. The performance is satisfactory; these pieces might be amazing with a better group. Informative notes in German and English.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: München, BR, Studio 1 (03/10/2009-03/13/2009).



Reviews

CPO 777464-2 Georg Schumann symphony serenade
The music of the German composer Georg Schumann will probably be unknown to most music-lovers. He was born in Koeningstein in 1866 and died in 1952. He studied first with his father and grandfather, a Kantor, and subsequently with the German composer, pianist, and conductor Friedrich Baumfelder (1836-1916). After studying at the Leipzig Conservatory, where his instructors included Carl Reinecke and Salomon Jadassohn, he was a choral conductor in Danzig (1891-1896) and conductor of the Bremen Philharmonic Orchestra (1896-1899). In 1900 he became professor and director at the Singakademie in Berlin. He became a member of the Prussian Academy of Arts in 1907, vice-president in 1918, and President in 1934. His works include Amor und Psyche, Op. 3 (1888) for soloists, choir and orchestra, two symphonies, the oratorio Ruth, Op. 50 (1909), and two Piano Trios, Opp. 25 and 62. After his death, his music fell into obscurity - a fate that has sadly befallen innumerable Romantic-era composers. Happily, thanks to enterprising CD companies, his music is being rediscovered, but during his lifetime he was regarded as a new romanticist. He composed his B-minor Symphony in Leipzig in 1887 when he was 18 years old and a student under Carl Reinecke. The following year he submitted it for a competition held by the Konzerthaus in Berlin for symphonic works and was awarded the first prize in a field of 57 composers, which won him instant fame in Germany. This earned the work its sobriquet "Prize-winning symphony." The serious opening movement, which reminds me in places of Robert Schumann's "Rhenish" Symphony, contrasts beautifully with the relaxed, sunny second. The scherzando third movement is followed by a bustling Allegro finale. A praiseworthy symphony indeed! Schumann's Serenade, a charming 30-minute work composed in 1902, completes the CD.
The performances are excellent and the recording quality is first-rate.
Ted Wilks
Submitted on 12/09/12 by Ted Wilks 
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Works Details

>Schumann, Georg : Symphony in B minor
  • Conductor: Christoph Gedschold
  • Ensemble: Muenchner Rundfunkorchester
  • Notes: München, BR, Studio 1 (03/10/2009-03/13/2009)
  • Running Time: 43 min. sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1887

>Schumann, Georg : Serenade for large orchestra, Op. 34
  • Conductor: Christoph Gedschold
  • Notes: München, BR, Studio 1 (03/10/2009-03/13/2009)
  • Running Time: 29 min. 6 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1902