1 800 222 6872

Eugène Ysae: Harmonies du soir and other poèmes / Samouli, violin; Lavrenov, violincelle; Belaud, violin; Giot, violin

Album Summary

>Ysaÿe, Eugène : Meditation, for cello & orchestra, Op. 16
>Ysaÿe, Eugène : Harmonies du soir, for string quartet & orchestra, Op. 31
>Ysaÿe, Eugène : Poeme elegiaque, Op. 12
>Ysaÿe, Eugène : Serenade, for cello & orchestra, Op. 22
>Ysaÿe, Eugène : Amitié, Op. 26
>Ysaÿe, Eugène : Exil, poem for violin & orchestra, Op. 25
Performers Conductor Ensembles Composer

Notes & Reviews:

Over time, the memory of Eugène Ysaÿe (Liège, 1858 - Brussels, 1931) the brilliant virtuoso gradually supplanted that of Ysaÿe the composer in the public consciousness. It should be reminded that Eugène Ysaÿe created in his poems for string instruments a totally new and original genre, distinguishing himself by a competence in writing and a harmonic richness that were far removed from the purely virtuosic merits of his early compositions. These poems are therefore thoroughly deserving of rediscovery. The French conductor Jean-Jacques Kantorow, Ysaÿe's great specialist, leads the Liège Royal Philharmonic and soloists through works for violin and orchestra, for cello and orchestra, for two violins and orchestra and for string quartet and orchestra.

American Record Guide, November/December 2014
Eugene Ysaye is mostly known for his music for solo violin and the quality of his playing and his teaching. This music for orchestra, with and without soloists, leads me to believe that if Ysaye were only known for his work as a composer he would still be among the musical giants of the late 19th Century and the early 20th. His work as a soloist and as a teacher eclipsed his reputation as a composer (he composed mainly as a vehicle for self expression) and his orchestral music slid off the 20th Century musical radar. Wanted it to be. Lyrical, dramatic, and romantic are three great ways of characterizing this music. It really captures that great flowering of orchestral color and string color that I associate with Chausson (and the booklet tells me that Chausson's PoFme for violin and orchestra drew its inspiration from Ysaye's PoFme Elegiaque). AmitiT is one of the most interesting and best-written concertos I have heard Exil, a hauntingly-beautiful piece Ysaye wrote in 1917 while he was in New York. All the playing is spectacular, and the music is deeply evocative and extremely moving.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Salle Philharmonique, Liège, Belgique (09/2012/11/2013).



Reviews

There are currently no reviews, be the first one!
Login or Create an Account to write a review
 

Also Purchased

Works Details

>Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931) : Méditation, for cello & orchestra, Op. 16
  • Performer: Thibault Lavrenov (Cello)
  • Conductor: Jean-Jacques Kantorow
  • Ensemble: Orchestre Philharmonique Royal de Liège
  • Running Time: 12 min. 36 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic

>Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931) : Harmonies du soir, for string quartet & orchestra, Op. 31
  • Conductor: Jean-Jacques Kantorow
  • Ensemble: Quatuor Ardente
  • Running Time: 14 min. sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Concerto

>Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931) : Poème élégiaque, Op. 12
  • Performer: Tatiana Samouil (Violin)
  • Conductor: Jean-Jacques Kantorow
  • Running Time: 15 min. 6 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Written: 1892-1893

>Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931) : Sérénade, for cello & orchestra, Op. 22
  • Performer: Thibault Lavrenov (Cello)
  • Conductor: Jean-Jacques Kantorow
  • Running Time: 7 min. 21 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic

>Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931) : Amitié, Op. 26
  • Performers: Emilie Belaud (Violin); Olivier Giot (Violin)
  • Conductor: Jean-Jacques Kantorow
  • Running Time: 16 min. 47 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Concerto

>Eugène Ysaÿe (1858 - 1931) : Exil, poem for violin & orchestra, Op. 25
  • Conductor: Jean-Jacques Kantorow
  • Running Time: 8 min. 6 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Concerto