1 800 222 6872

Phyllida Nash: Arabella [Box]

Track List

>Arabella
>Betsy began to cry, in an unconvincing way...
>His top-boots, on which he expended much thought...
>Mrs Tallant could not conceive it to be otherwise.
>Chapter 2
>Thus it was that, at four o'clock on this momentous day...
>Unfortunately their mirth reached the ears of old Nurse...
>Horrowgate, which was situated between Heythram...
>Hall, which was situated i n a pretty little park..., The
>He had a great many questions to ask her, and comments to make.
>Squire greeted Arabella wi th great joviality..., The
>Chapter 3
>This course was decided on.
>They spent two days at Arksey before taking the road again...
>Chapter 4
>Mr Beaumaris's habitual aspect was one of coldness, and reserve...
>Brough thought of the Davenport fowls roasting on the spits...
>scowl gave place to an enc ouraging smile..., The
>Arabella could not help opening her eyes a little...
>Lord Fleetwood, realising that his friend had embarked on...
>Chapter 5
>These cast the shops of High Harrowgate into the shade...
>These commodities having been found, the good lady...
>In face of her ladyship's conviction, Arabella hardly liked to...
>But none of these conclusions quite explained the morning visits...
>Chapter 6
>Lady Bridlington did her best to convey the sense of this...
>Lady Bridlington, presently setting eyes on Arabella
>He seemed to take her acquiescence for granted...
>Chapter 7
>Lady Bridlington was a trifle cast-down by this severity...
>Arabella's head sank; guilt and shame almost overpowered her.
>'You can't expect him to know that,' said Sir Geoffrey
>Mr. Beaumaris led her onto the floor, and encircled her waist...
>Chapter 8
>urchin nodded, knuckling h is eyes., The
>Arabella considered the question, and finally came...
>When Lord Bridlington returned from his morning excercise...
>Lord Fleetwood who had been regarding Jemmy...
>Chapter 9
>'You did very right,' said Arabella approvingly.
>Lord Fleetwood gave it up, and as Mr Beaumaris...
>Much relieved at having so easily cleared this fence...
>'How odious men are!' exclaimed Lady Bridlington indignantly.
>Mr Beaumaris was sorely tempted.
>This was maintained during most of the drive back to London...
>'I do in the country,' he replied.
>Chapter 10
>Bertram seemed to be about to take exception to this...
>'Very difficult situation,' responded Mr Scunthorpe...
>A close inspection of such sprigs of fashion...
>'You will certainly be much envied by Miss Tallant's numerous...
>Chapter 11
>In pursuance of this resolve, Mr Beaumaris sent for his curricle...
>Duchess gave a cackle of l aughter., The
>'She sounds to me an odd sort of a gal,' remarked her grace.
>Chapter 12
>After a slight pause, he said in his usual calm way...
>Mr Byng gave an angry snort, and drove off.
>For days before the event, housemaids were busy moving furniture...
>Emboldened by the intensive coaching of a noted French...
>Whether he redeemed this promise or not, Mr Beaumaris never knew...
>Chapter 13
>Once he had fallen in the way of going with Wivenhoe...
>It was at this stage in his career that two circumstances occurred...
>Ulysses, catching the note of severity in his voice...
>Mr Beaumaris, meanwhile, after dining at Brooks's...
>evening broke up rather ea rlier than usual..., The
>Chaper 14
>'Lord Wivenhoe! Oh, what a fool I have been!" cried Arabella
>After passing the entrances to several noisome alleys...
>He flushed, his hand going instinctively to the handkerchief...
>She coloured guiltily, for some such idea had just crossed her mind...
>Chaper 15
>Painswick bowed, and withdrew.
>Miss Tallant, obediently walking on to stare at one of the new...
>'I have a constitutional dislike of eloping at the dead of night,'...
>Chapter 16
>Mr Beaumaris then descended from the tilbury...
>'Oh I see!' said Bertram, his brow clearing. 'Well I must say...'
>Chapter 17
>No one, of course, could visit Vauxhall without eating...
>A week earlier, safe in the darkness of her bedchamber...
>door was softly closed beh ind them..., The
>'No, no, how can you say so?' she exclaimed...
>Arabella's awed expression became even more marked...

Album Remarks & Appraisals:

Perhaps the most deeply cherished novel among Heyer fans, Arabella is the story of a poor girl who captures the heart of a handsome and wealthy bachelor. When Arabella first arrives in London, she has only one mission: to snare a rich husband. With a mind to beat the competition, she pretends to be a rich heiress and soon finds herself the talk of the town, pursued by the most eligible bachelors in the city. But she has her sights on one man only: the much-hunted Mr Beaumaris. Our feisty heroine puts up a fight and deals the worldly-wise Beaumaris a deft hand in the game of love; at first grudgingly charmed, he soon becomes smitten. However, what will he think of her deceitful charade? Will it ruin her chance to be with the perfect man? Arabella contains some of Heyer's most witty dialogue and romantic banter; with its delightful and laugh-out-loud passages it is no wonder it remains the fan favourite.

Album Notes

Author: Georgette Heyer.

Editor: Ken Barton.

Reader: Phyllida Nash.



Reviews

There are currently no reviews, be the first one!
Login or Create an Account to write a review