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Leopold Stokowski Conducts the All-American Youth Orchestra & the Hollywood Bowl Symphony - CD Premières from Rare 78's, Rec. 1940-'46

Album Summary

>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Symphony no 6 in B minor ("Pathétique"), Op. 74
>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Songs (6), Op. 73
>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Morceaux, Op. 10
>Novácek, Ottokar : Perpetuum Mobile, concert caprice for violin & orchestra, Op. 5/4
>Rimsky-Korsakov, Nikolai : Flight of the Bumblebee
>Stravinsky, Igor : L'oiseau de feu (The Firebird), concert suite for orchestra no 2
>Stokowski, Leopold : Symphonic Synthesis on Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, for orchestra
>Mussorgsky, Modest : Pictures at an Exhibition (Kartinki s vïstavski), for orchestra, orchestrations other than Ravel's
>Stokowski, Leopold : Symphonic Synthesis, for orchestra (Tristan and Isolde - Love Music from Acts 2 & 3)
>Weber, Carl Maria von : Invitation to the Dance, in D flat major J 260/Op. 65
>Schumann, Robert : Kinderszenen no 7 ("Träumerei"), for piano, Op. 15/7
>Liszt, Franz : Hungarian Rhapsodies (19) for Piano, S 244
>Falla, Manuel de : El amor brujo
>Smith, John Stafford : The Star-spangled Banner
>Berlin, Irving : God Bless America
>Creston, Paul [Composer] : Symphony no 1, Op. 20
>Gould, Morton : Latin-American Symphonetta
>Still, William G. : Afro-American Symphony
>Cowell, Henry : Irish Tales (4), for piano & orchestra, HC 605
>Dolan, Robert Emmett : Lady in the Dark
>Clarke, Jeremiah : Prince of Denmark's March
>Haydn, Franz Joseph : Quartet for Strings Op. 3, no 5 18th Century Dance
>Schubert, Franz : Moments musicaux (6) for Piano, D 780/Op. 94
>Brahms, Johannes : Hungarian Dance for piano, 4 hands, in G minor, WoO 1/1
>Offenbach, Jacques : The Tales of Hoffmann
>Strauss II (Junior), Johann : Die Fledermaus
Performer Conductor Ensembles Composers

Notes & Reviews:

Stokowski formed the All-American Youth Orchestra in 1940, its players' ages ranging from 18 to 25. He sought to combat Nazi propaganda touting the wonders of Hitler youth with an artistic statement from young emissaries of the free world. The AAYO toured South America in 1940 and North America in 1941 and was met with rave reviews. These performances boast a unique combination of past and future: the wisdom of Stokowski's vast experience allied with the pure, undiminished idealism of youth. In 1945, Stokowski founded the Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra. The items included here, the only ones that had not been re-circulated on commercial CDs until now, are all brief, and for the most part within a range of varying degrees of lightness in content. Beautifully restored by Mark Obert-Thorn with liner notes by Richard Freed.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/04/1941); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/04/1941); Lieder Hall, New York (07/04/1941); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/04/1941); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/04/1941); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/05/1941); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/05/1941); Lieder Hall, New York (07/05/1941); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/05/1941); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/05/1941); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/08/1941); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/08/1941); Lieder Hall, New York (07/08/1941); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/08/1941); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/08/1941); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/10/1941); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/10/1941); Lieder Hall, New York (07/10/1941); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/10/1941); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/10/1941); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/11/1941); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/11/1941); Lieder Hall, New York (07/11/1941); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/11/1941); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/11/1941); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/24/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/24/1940); Lieder Hall, New York (07/24/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/24/1940); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/24/1940); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/25/1945); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (07/25/1945); Lieder Hall, New York (07/25/1945); Liederkranz Hall, New york (07/25/1945); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (07/25/1945); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/01/1945); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/01/1945); Lieder Hall, New York (08/01/1945); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/01/1945); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/01/1945); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/21/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/21/1940); Lieder Hall, New York (08/21/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/21/1940); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/21/1940); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/23/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/23/1940); Lieder Hall, New York (08/23/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/23/1940); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/23/1940); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/23/1946); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/23/1946); Lieder Hall, New York (08/23/1946); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/23/1946); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/23/1946); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/29/1945); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/29/1945); Lieder Hall, New York (08/29/1945); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/29/1945); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/29/1945); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/30/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/30/1940); Lieder Hall, New York (08/30/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/30/1940); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/30/1940); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/30/1946); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/30/1946); Lieder Hall, New York (08/30/1946); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/30/1946); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (08/30/1946); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (09/17/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (09/17/1940); Lieder Hall, New York (09/17/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (09/17/1940); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (09/17/1940); CBS Studios, Hollywood, CA (09/22/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (09/22/1940); Lieder Hall, New York (09/22/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (09/22/1940); Republic Studios, Hollywood, CA (09/22/1940).



Reviews

Stokowski's MGM Years
Stokowski and the AAYO and the AAO and the HBSO
All-American Youth Orchestra and All-American Orchestra
(Those recordings made in 1940 were with the first orchestra)
Disc One:
Tchaikovsky: Symphony #6 Pathetique
23 August 1940: Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires
22 September 1940: Liederkranz Hall, New York
Tchaikovsky (orch. Stokowski): Solitude
5 July 1941: CBS Studios Hollywood, California
Tchaikovsky (orch. Stokowski) Humoresque
10 July 1941 (same venue)
Novacek (orch. Stokowski) Perpetuum Mobile
11 July 1941 (same venue)
Rimsky-Korsakov (orch. Stokowski) Flight of the Bumble Bee
10 July 1941 (same venue)
Stravinsky: Firebird Suite
21 August 1940: Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires

Disc Two:
Mussorgsky (arr. Stokowski) Boris Godunov Symphonic Synthesis
4 July 1941: CBS Studios Hollywood California
Pictures at an Exhibition (orch. Stokowski)
1 July 1941 (same venue)
Wagner (arr. Stokowski) Tristan und Isolde--Love Music
17 September 1940 Liederkranz Hall, New York.

Disc Three (brace yourself)
Weber (orch. Berlioz/Stokowski) Invitation to the Dance
30 August 1940: Cinema Gran Rex Buenos Aires Brazil
Schumann (orch. Stokowski) Traumerei(No. 7 from Kinderszenen)
11 July 1941: CBS Studios Hollywood, California
Liszt (arr. Muller-Berghaus) Hungarian Rhapsody #2
8 July 1941(same venue)
Falla: Ritual Fire Dance (from El amor brujo)
10 July 1941 (same venue)
Pledge to the Flag (Goddard Lieberson, speaker) and Smith: The Star Spangled Banner
24 July 1940: Liederkranz Hall, New York.
Berlin: God Bless America
24 July 1940 (same venue)
Creston: Scherzo (from Symphony #1)
8 July 1941: CBS Studios, Hollywood, California
Gould: Guaracha (from Latin-American Symphonette)
5 July 1941 (same venue)
Still: Scherzo (from Afro-American Symphony)
21 August 1940: Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires
Cowell: Tales of Our Countryside
5 July 1941: CBS Studios, Hollywood, California

Hollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra
All were made in the Republic Studios in Hollywood, California

Dolan: Glamour Waltz (A Message for Lisa: from Lady in the Dark)
23 August 1946: Republic Studios, Hollywood, California
Clarke: Trumpet Voluntary: Prince of Denmark's March
(same date)
Haydn: (orch. Stokowski) Andante cantabile
30 August 1946
Schubert: (orch. Stokowski) Moment Musicale
29 August 1945
Brahms: (orch. Stokowski) Hungarian Dance #1
30 August 1946
Tchaikovsky: (orch. Stokowski) Solitude
25 July 1945
Tchaikovsky: (orch. Stokowski) Humoresque
1 August 1945
Offenbach: Barcolle (from The Tales of Hoffman)
29 August 1945
J. Strauss II (arr. Stokowski) Die Fledermaus--Waltzes
23 August 1946

Music and Arts 1287 (3 CDs)

This set is the first Stokowski release from Music and Arts since the passing of Fred Maroth, its founder. I worked with Fred a lot from 1983-94 when he issued recordings sponsored by the Leopold Stokowski Society of America. At that time he was about the only source of rare recordings made by conductors in the 78 era and from broadcasts. The releases were of consistently good pressings on LP and from various sources, some better than others. We owe him a debt of gratitude and now that he has passed his work is being continued. Kevin P. Mostyn is President, Meri Chu is Business Manager and Kitt Higginson is Production Manager & Client Relations Director.

I think I can now safely say that every single recording Stokowski made over the 50 years he made them (1917-1977) is in the Leopold Stokowski Recording Library, housed in my digs. A cursory check with the available discographies supports that hypothesis. Among the collection is a recording of the Native Folk Music Stokowski recorded during his tour of South America with the All-American Youth Orchestra (from a private source) and the experimental Bell Labs recordings that dabbled in stereo in the early 30s. Anyone wanting anything for research purposes please contact me.

There is an essay discussing the formation of these orchestras that is part of the insert and I've written about other recordings with these orchestras in other reviews of other releases. A brief commentary, however, would help anyone who isn't already aware and is curious.
Sometime in 1939 Stokowski convinced the American government and Columbia records to sponsor an orchestral trip to South American with an All-American Youth Orchestra. In 1939-40 he had young people from all over the country audition and he was personally involved in the decision making. One of the teenagers who was in that orchestra helped me found the Leopold Stokowski Society of America in 1983 (Warren Eason was his name and he still had a copy of his first check from the orchestra, signed by Stokowski)
Anyway, the orchestra started out in New York and made a few recordings (Liederkranz Hall, with special drapes Stokowski had put up to help the sound) then travelled down to Washington DC where they performed. Next they went to South America (primarily Brazil) where they performed and made a few recordings (see recording info above).
Over the years of the LSSA we issued a few recordings from the sources included in this release. Our first release, in fact, was from the Hollywood Bowl Symphony, the first uncut performance of Rachmaninoff's 2nd Symphony, the piece Stokowski was to record the day he died. That was issued in 1983 and recently mentioned in a Gramophone essay about the symphony. In addition we issued a Brahms 1st and Beethoven 5th with the AAYO/AAO. Those recordings were taken from Long Playing Records that Columbia was experimenting with. I came by those discs through a member of the society who literally found them in a closet at Columbia and asked for them. He, in turn, gave them to me. I played them on my system at home and the sound was amazing. No surface noise and plenty of transparency. (One of the discs contained the Boris Synthesis discussed below but the notes indicate it's from 78s). Stokowski was obsessed with the sound of recordings and once opined that some day they would sound better than live. His work on what came to be called the LP is but another example.
On the way back to the USA Stokowski stopped outside Mexico and brought some native musicians on board and they recorded some native music.
The following year Stokowski formed a second Youth Orchestra but this one had more professionals in it. (It should be noted that Richard Freed, who wrote the notes, doesn't differentiate between the first orchestra....AAYO and the second AAO...in his writing. This second orchestra toured the USA and ended up in LA where they made some recordings. WWII precluded another orchestra. A couple years later Stokowski formed the Hollywood Bowl Symphony (after leaving Philadelphia he often 'formed' orchestras, he created the New York City Symphony Orchestra around the same time) They performed and made some recordings for RCA. The Rachmaninoff Second I issued, however, was from a live performance.
About the recordings, Mark Obert-Thorn has an excellent article in the insert on the difficulty of making them because of the inherent problems in the recordings themselves...as mentioned the Leiderkrantz recording were made in a room designed by Stokowski with curtains added to help the sound. Those in South America have better depth than the New York recordings. On the other hand we have five fingers and a thumb: no, wait....there is a surface 'white-noise' even in that venue (a fact due to the available material: see Ward's article). The 1941 recordings sound much better...richer bass line, depth, fuller strings. Ward mentions that 'electronic reverberation' was added to the Columbia releases but wasn't necessary for the RCA (HBSO) And the HBSO recordings sound even better.
About the music on these discs, it should be noted that all of Stokowski's recordings at this time were during his peripatetic period between New York and California. The making of Fantasia and his involvement making recordings in the latter may have influenced this but all of them were given the MGM treatment; the strings have a swoon to them and melodrama hangs over everything, and everything is larger than life...somewhere over a rainbow.....it's not bad, it takes getting used to.
The Pathetique opens disc one. The piece has a personal meaning for me as it was the music I played, Stokowski's stereo recording, over the days of mourning when a student of mine killed himself in 1980. Particularly, the last movement is the one by which I still judge all recordings I listen to. Typical of all these All-American recordings, it doesn't have the transparency his RCA, Philadelphia ones do. The bass isn't as full as in those recordings either. Still, the Stokowski Sound, a legato but not achieved the usual way...rather from free bowing. Like many of these recordings it also reflects a Hollywood/MGM feel Stokowski adopted around the time of doing Fantasia and maintained pretty much through the 1940s. Strings sigh and pine like in a movie. This 'sound' was also true in his 1945 recording of The Pathetique with the Hollywood Bowl (on CALA 0506 and arguably his finest recording of it) His later, stereo was more Tchaikovsky than MGM. Not as melodramatic. The coda to this symphony should be tragic, not just sad as in some recordings, and so it is here.
There are some 'pops' transcriptions. The Bumble Bee is pure MGM intense....Stokowski delivered an even more intense recording 31 years later. The Firebird is a personal favorite piece of music and I judge all recordings by Stokowski's last one, from Phase 4 London. To be honest, none of Stokowski's other recordings can match that one and this is no exception. Oh, yeah, the surface 'white noise' disappears later into the recording. Has a lot of nice inner detail and tension I can sense the excitement of the young players digging into 'new' music. If you want an excellent 'historic' recording this beats any rivals...I know this sounds like damning with faint praise. It really is very good....
The next disc has more meat on the plate. The two Mussorgsky items are very good. The Godunov is very dark. The sound is from LA and is better than the AAYO recordings. I compared it with his Philadelphia recording from 1936. To hear this from HIS orchestra is truly amazing. The rich, full strings playing with free-bowling, the deep, rich bass line. On the other hand, this recording, from 5 years later, has a more forward sound and there are lovely details, like the harps, that register more clearly in this recording. On the other hand, there are some moments where there are serious pitch problems, no doubt from the sources used. Of course there is also the stereo recording and even though it doesn't have the Philadelphia lushness and fullness of that orchestra you really need to hear this in a modern recording. I've always preferred Stokowski' Pictures over Ravel's. Stokowski is more Russian right from the beginning. Once more the existence of Stokowski's Phase 4 recording kind-of makes this one reserved for the historical recording aficionado or someone who must have all Stokowski recordings. Either would love to hear Stokowski during his MGM phase. The Wagner is from 1940 and the sound is thin.
(Aside: having just revisited the stereo recordings I really think that if you like The Stokowski Sound you should have one of his earlier recordings. Both have more of that free-bowling legato and rich strings so a part of HIS SOUND.....back when conductors had a SOUND. The Philadelphia recording is on an Andante set that includes a lot of Stokowski's 'modern' recordings with the likes of Schonberg, and Hindemith. 9878)
The third disc is largely of a "pop" nature with a few exceptions and they are worth the price of the set to add to your collection. The disc contains, apparently, the ONLY recording available of the Cowell....I find that hard to believe so it's good I don't have to...I've not checked the Still (which demonstrates Stokowski's commitment to the music of "Negroes" as he would have said it) nor the Creston...the Cowell and Creston were, by the way , on a Leopold Stokowski Society of America LP. So, while this may be the first CD release....the Gould is typical light fare, pseudo Latin....reminds me of 50s music I'd hear around the house at times....Those four pieces are possibly the most interesting in the set. They all also attest to Stokowski's promoting 'new music' and are the most interesting in the set.
The Hollywood Bowl recordings might well have a subtitle Stokowski Works since most of them are arranged or orchestrated by him. The HBSO has much better sound but then probably better musicians (culled from the LA Philharmonic) and a better recording venue. Sound is fuller, richer, more The Stokowski Sound. MGM is still there, don't overdose on the Dolan. The rest is what you might expect from a pops disc. The Brahms is amazing. The Strauss is also excellent. Sound is consistent from these RCA recordings regardless of recording dates.
Anyone interested in the Stokowski legacy or the history of recorded sound will find these discs worth adding to their collection.


Submitted on 05/30/15 by Stumpf 
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Works Details

>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Symphony no 6 in B minor ("Pathétique"), Op. 74
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Ensemble: áAll-American Youth Orchestra
  • Notes: Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (08/23/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (08/23/1940); Cinema Gran Rex, Buenos Aires (09/22/1940); Liederkranz Hall, New york (09/22/1940)
  • Running Time: 46 min. 7 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1893

>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Songs (6), Op. 73
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Ensemble: áHollywood Bowl Symphony Orchestra
  • Running Time: 3 min. 30 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1893

>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Morceaux, Op. 10 :: 2. Humoresque
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 2 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1871

>Novácek, Ottokar : Perpetuum Mobile, concert caprice for violin & orchestra, Op. 5/4
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 3 min. 17 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: circa 1895

>Rimsky-Korsakov, Nikolai : Flight of the Bumblebee
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 1 min. 28 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Written: 1901

>Stravinsky, Igor : L'oiseau de feu (The Firebird), concert suite for orchestra no 2
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 19 min. 14 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1919

>Stokowski, Leopold : Symphonic Synthesis on Mussorgsky's Boris Godunov, for orchestra
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 22 min. 38 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1922

>Mussorgsky, Modest : Pictures at an Exhibition (Kartinki s vïstavski), for orchestra, orchestrations other than Ravel's
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 5 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1896

>Stokowski, Leopold : Symphonic Synthesis, for orchestra (Tristan and Isolde - Love Music from Acts 2 & 3)
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 23 min. 33 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1957-1959

>Weber, Carl Maria von : Invitation to the Dance, in D flat major J 260/Op. 65
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 8 min. 40 sec.
  • Period Time: Classical
  • Written: 1819

>Schumann, Robert : Kinderszenen no 7 ("Träumerei"), for piano, Op. 15/7
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 3 min. 22 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1838

>Liszt, Franz : Hungarian Rhapsodies (19) for Piano, S 244
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 8 min. 6 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1860

>Falla, Manuel de : El amor brujo
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 3 min. 27 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Written: 1914

>Smith, John Stafford : The Star-spangled Banner
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 2 sec.
  • Period Time: Classical
  • Form: Choral
  • Written: circa 1799

>Berlin, Irving : God Bless America
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 8 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1938

>Creston, Paul [Composer] : Symphony no 1, Op. 20 :: Scherzo
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 4 min. 5 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1940

>Gould, Morton : Latin-American Symphonetta :: Guaracha
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Notes: Composition written: 1941.
  • Running Time: 3 min. 39 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Written: 1941

>Still, William G. : Afro-American Symphony :: Scherzo
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 59 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 12/06/1930

>Cowell, Henry : Irish Tales (4), for piano & orchestra, HC 605
  • Performer: Henry Cowell (Piano)
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 44 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 1940

>Dolan, Robert Emmett : Lady in the Dark :: Tales of Our Countryside
  • Performer: Henry Cowell (Piano)
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 1 min. 58 sec.
  • Written: 1944

>Clarke, Jeremiah : Prince of Denmark's March
  • Performer: Henry Cowell (Piano)
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Notes: Composition written: 1697.
  • Running Time: 2 min. 19 sec.
  • Period Time: Baroque
  • Form: March
  • Written: 1697

>Haydn, Franz Joseph : Quartet for Strings Op. 3, no 5 18th Century Dance :: Tales of Our Countryside
  • Performer: Henry Cowell (Piano)
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 3 min. 12 sec.
  • Period Time: Classical
  • Form: Chamber Music
  • Written: by 1777

>Schubert, Franz : Moments musicaux (6) for Piano, D 780/Op. 94
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 6 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1823

>Brahms, Johannes : Hungarian Dance for piano, 4 hands, in G minor, WoO 1/1
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 3 min. 18 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1858-1868

>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Songs (6), Op. 73
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 3 min. 30 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1893

>Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich : Morceaux, Op. 10 :: 2. Humoresque
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 4 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Written: 1871

>Offenbach, Jacques : The Tales of Hoffmann :: Barcarolle
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 2 min. 34 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Form: Opera/Operetta

>Strauss II (Junior), Johann : Die Fledermaus :: Waltzes
  • Conductor: Leopold Stokowski
  • Running Time: 5 min. 13 sec.
  • Period Time: Romantic
  • Form: Opera/Operetta
  • Written: 1874