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Peace (U.K.): Happy People [Deluxe Edition] [Digipak] *

Track List

>O You
>Gen Strange
>Lost On Me
>Perfect Skin
>Happy People
>I'm a Girl
>Under The Moon
>World Pleasure
>Love Me
>God's Gloves
>Saturday Girl
>Flirting USA
>Music Was To Blame, The

Album Reviews:

NME (Magazine) - "Koisser has a good ear for what works in a pop song...while Douglas Castle is quietly developing into one of the most distinctive guitarists in the current indie-rock climate."

Album Notes

Lyricist: Harrison Kaisser.

Personnel: Harrison Kaisser (vocals, guitar); Douglas Castle (guitar); Dominic Boyce (drums, background vocals); Sam Kaisser (background vocals).

Audio Mixer: Craig Silvey.

Recording information: Blue Box Studios, London; Dean Studios, London; Ravenscourt Studios, London; Rockfield Studios, Wales; Sarm Studios, London.

Photographer: Fiona Garden.

Birmingham indie pop quartet Peace's follow-up to their successful debut In Love sees them polish up their guitar melodies and Harry Koisser's vocals with the addition of strings, synths, and an array of different sounds that expand their Brit-pop-inspired sound. There's no denying that this album was primed for the radio and their largely younger fan base, with easily digestible, clean-edged songs. They brought Arctic Monkeys and Kasabian producer Jim Abbiss on board and with that the entire record feels far more refined and complete than their debut, bringing together uptempo grooves with some of the psych-rock influences that underpin "Lost on Me" and closer "World Pleasure." It's obvious that Koisser has concentrated on the songwriting for this record, illustrating his ear for a melody throughout and providing some insightful moments on the Oasis-influenced "Someday." However, despite the care taken, the lyrics often fall flat amongst the soaring melodies and anthemic choruses, resulting in a rather conflicted listen between the words and the music. Peace appear far more self-aware on this release, the swagger and charm that In Love burst onto the scene with now replaced by the angst and introspection of sexuality on "I'm a Girl" and the moody title track. Having produced a solid second album -- a hurdle many before them have failed to clear -- Peace can feel satisfied that they've grown from their debut, if only marginally, yet it's clear they're still finding their voice amongst the joyous, optimistic melodies that are the basis of so much of their sound. ~ Scott Kerr


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