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James Taylor (Soft Rock): Before This World [Deluxe] [CD/DVD]

Track List

>Today Today Today
>You and I Again
>Angels of Fenway
>Stretch of the Highway
>Watchin' Over Me
>Before This World/Jolly Springtime
>Far Afghanistan
>Wild Mountain Thyme
>9lb Hammer
>6/4 Shuffle
>Joshua Gone Barbados
>Whenever You're Ready
>There We Were: The Recording of James Taylor's Before This World

Album Reviews:

Rolling Stone - 3.5 stars out of 5 -- "The simplicity of the music matches Taylor's nostalgic mood. With its renewed focus on his voice and guitar -- both miraculously unscarred by time and excess -- BEFORE THIS WORLD is the most direct studio record he has made in many years."

Billboard - 3.5 stars out of 5 -- "[A]fter decades of soul-searching, he's still enjoying the ride."

Album Notes

James Taylor never sets his guitar down -- he spends a good portion of every year satisfying faithful audiences -- but he did rest his pen, opting to sit out the 13 years following the release of 2002's October Road. He kept busy with covers albums and Christmas records, but Before This World finds Taylor returning to writing, a habit he abandoned about a decade prior. Often, Before This World contains echoes of the first decade of the new millennium -- there is a passing reference to 9/11 in a song about Afghanistan and a love letter to the Boston Red Sox's 2004 World Series win -- but Taylor wrote these all in a batch, then recorded them at home with his touring band. Such quick progress gives the record a cozy, unified feeling but, unlike some latter-day JT records, it's not too comfortable. Taylor is randy enough to sing about some "first-class poontang" on the nicely grooving "Stretch of the Highway," a song more notable for a mellow vamp worthy of Steely Dan, the first suggestion there's a bit more variety here than on a typical Taylor platter. He'll ease into his trademark laid-back pop, opening the proceedings with "Today Today Today" and brightening up the midsection with the happy "Watchin' Over Me," but as the record comes toward its conclusion, he takes detours into traditional English folk on "Before This World/Jolly Springtime" and "Wild Mountain Thyme," while etching out a cinematic protest song in "Far Afghanistan." When a record runs only ten tracks and 41 minutes, these departures amount to nearly half the record and turn Before This World into something unexpected: a record as relaxed as the average James Taylor album but one that's also riskier and richer, the right album for him to make at this date. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine


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