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Suede: Dog Man Star

Album Reviews:

Rolling Stone (12/29/94-1/12/95, p.185) - "...For jean genies who cream over Bowie's ALADDIN SANE, it's very nearly the Second Coming....Rushing, with splendid haircuts, to the apocalypse, these brass-knuckled poseurs pause even so to mourn for Jimmy Dean...rip off Byron...and evoke Marilyn..."

Spin (12/94, p.78) - Ranked #9 in Spin's `20 Best Albums Of '94' - "...operatic ballads gushing tragic vulnerability David Bowie was too cynical to pull off, and anthems that ooze `Sign O' The Times' consequence..."

Spin (12/94, p.103) - Highly Recommended - "...moments where it clangs and thumps much like a rock band...but it's at its finest when most flamboyant....The glam wonderland on which Suede was weaned is still evident, but...capable of far surpassing its perceived limitations..."

Entertainment Weekly (11/4/94, p.77) - "...When Brett Anderson snivels in his glam falsetto--and his band's guitars somersault into luscious swirls-- these U.K. fashion types are able to pull off their spoiled-teenager pose..." - Rating: B

Q (11/94, p.123) - 5 Stars - Indispensable - "...With DOG MAN STAR, the group has vindicated just about every claim that was ever made on their behalf...It will be hailed in years to come as the crowning achievement of a line-up that reinvented English, guitar-band rock..."

Alternative Press (1/95, pp.61-63) - "...Suede remain the most challenging thing on the pop scene right now..."

Musician (4/95, p.78) - "...there's no other band around today that work so hard at playing the sensitive foppish dandy, even down to the rubbery Mick Ronson...riffs of guitarist Bernard Butler....Suede suddenly appear to have true staying power, a la Bowie himself..."

Mojo (Publisher) (1/95, p.51) - Included in Mojo's "25 Best Albums of 1994".

NME (Magazine) (12/24/94, p.22) - Ranked #8 in NME's list of the `Top 50 Albums Of 1994.'

NME (Magazine) (10/01/94, p.47) - 9 - Excellent Plus - "...Suede have brilliantly sent up modern life as an endless comic opera, a seaside postcard dipped in cheap lager and Coca-Cola..."

Album Notes

Contains the hidden track "Modern Boys" which follows "Still Life."

The London Suede: Brett Anderson (vocals); Bernard Butler (guitar); Mat Ostman (bass); Simon Gilbert (drums).

Additional personnel: Tessa Niles (vocals); Andrew Cronshaw (cimbalom, Ba-Wu flute); Roddy Lorimer (flute, saxophone); Simon Clarke (trumpet); Richard Edwards (trombone); Phil Overhead (percussion); Sinfonia Of London, The Tricycle Theatre Workshop.

In 1993 when The London Suede introduced their neo-glam sound to the pop market, critics tripped over themselves dropping names ranging from The Smiths to T. Rex, all the while trying to determine where Suede fell in the scheme of British rock. Was Suede glam? Were they the much heralded but vaguely defined "new wave" of the new wave? Now with their second album DOG MAN STAR it all comes into focus.

Side-stepping rock's constant judgements, the London Suede have strengthened their grip on the fickle British pop market. Brett Anderson's half hysterical, half morose, and all-the-while introspective stance on life as a pop star is charmingly reminiscent of rock's favorite crooner, Morrissey, from one of rock's most beloved British neo-glam bands, The Smiths.

With DOG MAN STAR the band has grown past its glam guitar pose and evolved into a fiercely melodic, lushly arranged orchestration of modern rock. Building off Anderson's gift for witty double-edged lyrics, DOG MAN STAR becomes the listener's guide to modern London. By the second track, "We Are The Pigs," Anderson's keen eye for detail is in place as he paints the picture of London's riot-filled streets. "We all watch them burn," sing school children over the sounds of crackling flames, and the listener can't help but take notice. Glam or not, the London Suede will remain the dominant force in British guitar rock.


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