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Joachim Niikolas Eggert (1779-1813): Symphonies Nos. 2 and 4 / Gavle SO, Korsten

Album Summary

>Eggert, Joachim Nicolas : Symphony no 4 in C minor
>Eggert, Joachim Nicolas : Symphony no 2 in G minor
Conductor Ensembles Composer

Notes & Reviews:

One of the more forward-looking Swedish composers and conductors of his age, Eggert died before achieving wider European recognition and has remained neglected ever since. The Second Symphony evokes moods both stormy and lyrical, revealing a technical brilliance that foreshadows Schubert. The Fourth Symphony reflects the military backdrop to the political unrest of the times, its alternative slow movement being one of Eggert's most powerful and progressive works. Symphonies Nos. 1 and 3 can be heard on Naxos 8.572457.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Gävle Concert Hall, Sweden (03/10/2014-03/14/2014).



Reviews

Swedish Progressive
It would be disingenuous to assert that this disc contains 2 hitherto undiscovered symphonic masterpieces. Instead, what we have are 2 fascinating works of some significance. Eggert emerged during the early part of the 19th century after Kraus, one of Swedens most accomplished symphonic pioneers and prior to Berwald, one of the genres true masters. Both works are cast in the standard 4 movement template typical of the era. There are hints of Haydn, Beethoven and especially Schubert. The writing unfolds with a high degree of confidence and grace. The orchestrations contain novel and unusual coloristic touches. The harmonic and thematic development reveal skill and imagination. Yet as impressive as these 2 symphonies are, neither really crosses that elusive threshold of uncontested genius. Still its good to have them if only for historical perspective. The music vividly comes to life under Maestro Korstens perceptive leadership. The Gavle S.O. play with consummate verve and nuance. The sonics are full bodied, transparent and natural.
Submitted on 02/19/16 by Allen Cohen 
Masterful works
If Joseph Martin Kraus (1758-1792) is known as the "Swedish Mozart," it might seem logical to consider his successor, Joachim Nikolas Eggert (1779-1813), the "Swedish Schubert." While there's a strong stylistic resemblance between Schubert and Eggert, to my ears Eggert's music more closely resembles Beethoven's.

That's not surprising. Eggert was a forward-looking composer and music director. He introduced several of Beethoven's important works to the Swedish court, sometimes shortly after their Viennese premiere. Like Schubert, Eggert used Beethoven as a starting point, rather than a model.

Symphony No. 2 was premiered in 1806 and reminds me somewhat of Schubert's earliest symphonies (written in 1813-14). While there's a certain Haydnesque elegance to the work and a healthy dose of Beethovenian drama, it's a symphony that still looks ahead, rather than behind.

The same is true of Eggert's last completed symphony, No. 4 "War and Peace." It was written in 1810 after Sweden had lost her conflict with Napoleon. Eggert's symphony has stormy sections (especially at the beginning), yet ultimately resolves peaceably. While Eggert didn't quite have Schubert's melodic gift, the themes easily flow one to another in a Schubertian fashion.

For those who love Beethoven and Schubert, I highly recommend Eggert. You'll find stylistically he fits neatly between those two giants.
Submitted on 08/18/16 by RGraves321 
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Works Details

>Eggert, Joachim Nicolas : Symphony no 4 in C minor
  • Conductor: Gerard Korsten
  • Ensemble: Gavle Symphony Orchestra
  • Notes: Gävle Concert Hall, Sweden (03/10/2014-03/14/2014)
  • Running Time: 33 min. 19 sec.
  • Period Time: Classical
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1810

>Eggert, Joachim Nicolas : Symphony no 2 in G minor
  • Conductor: Gerard Korsten
  • Notes: Gävle Concert Hall, Sweden (03/10/2014-03/14/2014)
  • Running Time: 31 min. 21 sec.
  • Period Time: Classical
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1806