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Frank Zappa: The Lumpy Money Project/Object: An FZ Audio Documentary

Track List

>I Sink Trap [Original Orchestral Edit]
>II Gum Joy [Original Orchestral Edit]
>III Up & Down [Original Orchestral Edit]
>IV Local Butcher [Original Orchestral Edit]
>V Gypsy Airs [Original Orchestral Edit]
>VI Hunchy Punchy [Original Orchestral Edit]
>VII Foamy Soaky [Original Orchestral Edit]
>VIII Let's Eat Out [Original Orchestral Edit]
>IX Teen-Age Grand Finale [Original Orchestral Edit]
>Are You Hung Up? - (Original Mono Mix)
>Who Needs the Peace Corps? - (Original Mono Mix)
>Concentration Moon - (Original Mono Mix)
>Mom & Dad - (Original Mono Mix)
>Telephone Conversation - (Original Mono Mix)
>Bow Tie Daddy - (Original Mono Mix)
>Harry, You're a Beast - (Original Mono Mix)
>What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body? - (Original Mono Mix)
>Absolutely Free - (Original Mono Mix)
>Flower Punk - (Original Mono Mix)
>Hot Poop - (Original Mono Mix)
>Nasal Retentive Calliope Music - (Original Mono Mix)
>Let's Make the Water Turn Black - (Original Mono Mix)
>Idiot Bastard Son, The - (Original Mono Mix)
>Lonely Little Girl - (Original Mono Mix)
>Take Your Clothes Off When You Dance - (Original Mono Mix)
>What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body? (Reprise) - (Original Mono Mix)
>Mother People - (Original Mono Mix)
>Chrome Plated Megaphone of Destiny, The - (Original Mono Mix)
>Lumpy Gravy, Pt. 1 [Umrk Remix]
>Lumpy Gravy, Pt. 2 [Umrk Remix]
>Are You Hung Up? [Umrk Remix]
>Who Needs the Peace Corps? [Umrk Remix]
>Concentration Moon [Umrk Remix]
>Mom & Dad [Umrk Remix]
>Telephone Conversation [Umrk Remix]
>Bow Tie Daddy [Umrk Remix]
>Harry, You're a Beast [Umrk Remix]
>What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body? [Umrk Remix]
>Absolutely Free [Umrk Remix]
>Flower Punk [Umrk Remix]
>Hot Poop [Umrk Remix]
>Nasal Retentive Calliope Music [Umrk Remix]
>Let's Make the Water Turn Black [Umrk Remix]
>Idiot Bastard Son [Umrk Remix], The
>Lonely Little Girl [Umrk Remix]
>Take Your Clothes off When You Dance [Umrk Remix]
>What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body? (Reprise) [Umrk Remix]
>Mother People [Umrk Remix]
>Chrome Plated Megaphopne of Destiny [Umrk Remix], The
>How Did That Get in Here?
>Lumpy Gravy "Shuffle"
>Dense Slight
>Unit 3A, Take 3
>Unit 2, Take 9
>Section 8, Take 22
>"My Favorite Album"
>Unit 9
>N. Double A, AA
>Theme From Lumpy Gravy
>"What the Fuck's Wrong With Her?"
>Intelligent Design
>Lonely Little Girl [Original Composition-Take 24]
>"That Problem With Absolutely Free"
>Absolutely Free
>Harry, You're a Beast
>What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body? (Reprise) [Instrumental]
>Creationism
>Idiot Bastard Snoop
>Idiot Bastard Son, The
>"What's Happening of the Universe"
>"The World Will Be a Far Happier Place"
>Lonely Little Girl
>Mom & Dad
>Who Needs the Peace Corps?
>"Really Little Voice"
>Take Your Clothes Off When You Dance
>Lonely Little Girl
>"In Conclusion"

Album Notes

Audio Mixers: Dick Kunc; Frank Zappa; Joe Travers.

Liner Note Authors: Gail Zappa; David Fricke.

Recording information: ??/??/1964-10/22/1971.

Photographer: Linda McCartney.

This triple volume package contains an audio documentary tracing the conception and construction of Frank Zappa's We're Only in It for the Money (1968) and Lumpy Gravy (1968) masterworks. As the second entry in the Project/Object series (the first being the MoFo Project/Object in 2006 that gathered four CDs worth of goodies from the Freak Out! era), the modus operandi for Lumpy Money (2009) remains much the same as its predecessor. Presented within are primary components from both works in several unique -- and formerly unissued -- incarnations and configurations. It should also be noted that neither of Zappa's mid-'90s approved masters for We're Only in It for the Money or Lumpy Gravy are found here. Instead of retreading those -- which (as of this 2009 writing) remain in print on the Rykodisc label -- the nearly three-and-a-half hours served up here offer an embarrassment of insight into the development of the music, as well as the modular recording style that Zappa was evermore frequently incorporating into his craft. First up is the parenthetically monikered "Primordial" Lumpy Gravy. It is alternately known as Zappa's Capitol Records' orchestral edit. The story goes, as Zappa was not under contract as a conductor with any other record labels at the time, he was able to finagle a deal and ultimately (albeit briefly) issue a "Primordial" version of the work. Presented for the first time in over four decades, Zappa Family Trust archivist Joe Travers was able to restore this pristine monaural artifact direct from the 1/4" analog master tape. As presented in this fashion, the piece is divided into nine unique movements. Keen-eared Zappaphiles will unquestionably notice sections and snippets that would reappear in Lumpy Gravy. Likewise, there are a few sonic references that foreshadow Zappa's future endeavors. Most specifically, "VII Foamy Soaky" and the movement's obvious relationship to the Mothers of Invention's instrumental showcase "King Kong." The remainder of the first CD is dedicated to the original monaural mix -- created by Zappa with his (then) engineer Dick Kunc in 1968 -- of We're Only in It for the Money. Disc Two opens up with the primarily unheard 1984 remix of Lumpy Gravy that Zappa cooked up in his own Utility Muffin Research Kitchen studios. According to Gail Zappa's liner note text, "although...never released, FZ did include a track entitled "Lumpy Gravy (Excerpt)" in a promotional disc for The Old Masters, Box One." In addition to the 3:01 used in that extract, the rest of Zappa's distinctive upgrade can be heard here. Among the most prominent variations are the opening melody -- which is titled "Duodenum" or alternately the "Lumpy Gravy Theme." As offered on the 1984 upgrade, it contains prominent vocal overdubs by Ike Willis and lyrical references to Zappa's concurrent conceptual epic Thing-Fish (1984). Disc Two concludes with the mid-'80s refurbishment/remix of We're Only in It for the Money. The album is presented just as it sounded upon its initial availability on CD in 1986. Due to copious alterations -- notably some material being sped up, not to mention new rhythm section overdubs by Arthur Barrow (bass) and Chad Wackerman (drums) -- at the time, many purists balked at what they heard as revisionist history. It was ultimately replaced in the mid-'90s with a restored stereo edition, making this mid-'80s adaptation an out of print collector's item, until resurfacing here. As digital audio technology was truly in its infancy circa the mid-'80s, both have been given a modern remastering by Grammy-award winning engineer Bernie Grundman. The contents of Disc Three join the "Primordial" Lumpy Gravy as significant additions for those listeners who find themselves intrigued by Zappa's "Anything Anytime Anyplace for No Reason at All" ethos. Both tucked away and boldly displayed are copious examples of Zappa as composer, musician, and social satirist in equal measure. Nowhere are they more evident than the aptly titled opener "How Did That Get in Here?." Credited as "an FZ construction," the 25-plus-minute suite is chock-full of themes, motifs, and aural evidence that would show up at various and sundry times throughout Lumpy Gravy, We're Only in It for the Money, and beyond. There are two categories of spoken word selections. While "That Problem with Absolutely Free," "Lumpy Gravy Shuffle," and "My Favorite Album," are interview excerpts, "Dense Slight" and "Intelligent Design" are termed "Building Blocks" (i.e. structures that were specifically created and saved by Zappa). Guitarist Eric Clapton provides the voice-over on "The World Will Be a Far Happier Place" and "In Conclusion." Comparatively more traditional are the assorted alternate and instrumental takes of "Absolutely Free," "Harry, You're a Beast," "What's the Ugliest Part of Your Body?," "The Idiot Bastard Son,""Mom & Dad," "Who Needs the Peace Corps?," "Take Your Clothes Off When You Dance," and no less than three different arrangements of "Lonely Little Girl." Ardent enthusiasts will inevitably note that there are several selections not found in this cache. According to vault keeper Travers, there were a number of reasons -- such as M.I.A. master tapes -- that meant, for instance, that an instrumental-only "Mother People" could not be included. The packaging is worthy of mention as the sturdy cardboard digipack -- which houses the CDs -- surrounds the disc with six fold-out panels bearing reproductions of the original artwork for each of the albums. ~ Lindsay Planer



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