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Jimmy Smith (Organ): Bashin': The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith

Album Notes

Personnel: Jimmy Smith (organ); Oliver Nelson (conductor); Babe Clark, Bob Ashton, Gerry Dodgion, Phil Woods, George Barrow (reeds); Joe Newman, Doc Severinsen, Joe Wilder, Ernie Royal (trumpet); Tommy Mitchell, Jimmy Cleveland, Urbie Green, Britt Woodman (trombone); Quentin Warren, Barry Galbraith (guitar); George Duvier (bass); Donald Bailey, Ed Shaughnessy (drums).

Recorded in New York, New York on March 26 & 28, 1962. Originally released on Verve (V6-8474). Includes original release liner notes by Del Shields.

All tracks have been digitally remastered.

This is part of the Verve Master Edition series.

Personnel: Jimmy Smith (organ); Babe Clark, Robert Ashton, Gerry Dodgion, Phil Woods, George Barrow (saxophone); Joe Newman, Doc Severinsen, Joe Wilder, Ernie Royal (trumpet); Tommy Mitchell, Jimmy Cleveland, Urbie Green, Britt Woodman (trombone); Jimmy Warren, Barry Galbraith (guitar); George Duvivier (bass); Don Bailey, Ed Shaughnessy (drums).

Recorded in New York, New York on March 26 & 28, 1962. Originally released on Verve (V6-8474). Includes original release liner notes by Del Shields.

Smith's debut session for Verve kicks off with an explosive big band sound. The first four tracks of BASHIN' feature a sizeable backing orchestra (whose personnel list that may ring some unexpected bells, like future Tonight Show bandleader Doc Severinsen) and dramatic arrangements by Oliver Nelson (who also assumes conducting duties). While fans of Smith's lower-key trio work for Blue Note may cringe at the blare of horns and the grandiose dynamic shifts, Smith is still in uber-cool form, and his Hammond plays the groovy foil to Nelson's occasionally square arrangements.

Die-hard enthusiasts of the trio won't be disappointed, however, since the last three tracks are strictly old school. Quentin Warren and Donald Bailey help mix it up in deep blues fashion on "Beggar For the Blues" and the title track, while Smith, even after the large-scale blasts of Bernstein's "Walk On The Wild Side" and Nelson's "Step Right Up," seems right at home. This disc, released in 1962, captures the artist at a transition period, and proves that no matter the band, year or label, Smith was a consistently compelling artist.



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