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Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass: S.R.O.

Track List

>Our Day Will Come
>Mexican Road Race
>I Will Wait for You
>Bean Bag
>Wall Street Rag, The
>Work Song, The
>Mame
>Blue Sunday
>Don't Go Breaking My Heart
>For Carlos
>Freight Train Joe
>Flamingo

Album Remarks & Appraisals:

On September 9, legendary jazz musician Herb Alpert will re-release 24 classic albums from his illustrious catalog. The albums were remastered from the original analog tape mixes by Grammy-winning mastering engineer Bernie Grundman, who was the mastering engineer on many of the Tijuana Brass and Alpert albums. All releases, several of which have been out of print for a number of years (in Europe, some have not been available in over 30 years!), will be presented with their original artwork, making this collection must-have for the Herb Alpert fan!

Album Notes

Audio Remasterer: Bernie Grundman.

Liner Note Author: Chuck Champlin.

Recording information: Gold Star Recording Studios.

Arranger: Herb Alpert.

By late 1966, it seemed as if every TV commercial and every pop arranger had latched onto the Herb Alpert "Ameriachi" sound -- at which point the resourceful originator of that sound began to pare it down and loosen it up a bit. S.R.O. (Standing Room Only), referring to the Tijuana Brass' string of sold-out concerts, is an accurate title, for this LP is about a seven-piece band loaded with experienced jazzers who groove and swing together to a greater degree than on their previous albums. Sure, the arrangements are very tightly knit and don't allow much room for spontaneity, but they still sound fresh and uninhibited, and Alpert often allows the flavor of jazz to come through more clearly. Indeed, two of the album's three hit singles, "The Work Song" and "Flamingo," are jazz tunes -- the former nervous and driving, the latter joyously kicking -- and the third, "Mame," gets a nifty Dixieland treatment a la Louis Armstrong, with Alpert singing one verse. The sleeping gem of the record is guitarist John Pisano's "Freight Train Joe," a wistfully evocative tune that won't quit the memory, and the mournful Alpert/Pisano/Nick Ceroli tune "For Carlos" later became Wes Montgomery's "Wind Song." Though S.R.O. only went to number two on the LP charts, Alpert's creativity and popularity were still peaking. ~ Richard S. Ginell



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