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Vivaldi / Carmignola, Marcon, Venice Baroque Orchestra

Album Summary

>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in G minor, RV 331
>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in C major, RV 190
>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in G minor, RV 325
>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in D major, RV 217
>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin in G major, RV 303
Performers Conductor Ensemble Composer

Notes & Reviews:

"While not quite as musically distinguished or as fancifully adorned with the characterful stylistic touches and abundance of memorable tunes we've heard on some other releases in Carmignola and Marcon's series of Vivaldi concertos (both on Archiv and Sony), there's no shortage of drama and dazzling virtuosity on display in these five concertos, which the producers claim are first recordings. Carmignola never disappoints, and you can be assured that he won't let you down here in terms of sheer artistry, which includes healthy doses of personality and style. As I've said before in reviews of this violinist's Vivaldi performances, when he plays you're never sure how much is Vivaldi and how much is the soloist--there's so much passion and fire in the execution. But performer and composer seem so compatible, everything seems so right--the quick and furious runs, the gritty spiccato, the blink-of-an-eye ornaments, the beguiling singing in the slow movements, the bowing that sounds absolutely enchanted, flying at impossible speed above and across the strings--that you have to believe that you've never really heard Vivaldi before. Aided and abetted by Andrea Marcon and one of the world's top Baroque-period orchestras (the precision, energy, and vibrant sound of this ensemble is a marvel all its own), not to mention the clear, you-are-there sonics, Carmignola offers yet another reason to revisit and reconsider this prolific and oft-maligned composer, who at best was a genius, and at other times was nothing less than a consummate master of idiom and technique, especially regarding the violin: no one wrote more outlandish, outrageously challenging, audience-pleasing music for that instrument, and no one is better suited to show off its attributes than Carmignola." -Classics Today

BBC Music Magazine
Six unfamiliar concertos... show how skilled Vivaldi was at turning baroque clichés in unexpected directions. Carmignola finds wit in the first, and tenderness in the second, all articulated through subtle rubato which grows naturally out of the music. ...he's admirably partnered by the orchestra, which phrases sensitively, and knows when to attack the music, and when to be more yielding. A sparkling issue.

Gramophone Classical Music Guide
Giuliano Carmignola and the Venice Baroque Orchestra here return to the all-Vivaldi format which has so far served them well. Given that the concertos on this release are advertised as world premiere recordings, that seems sensible enough. The mushrooming of the Vivaldi catalogue means that the excitement of hearing 'new' works can be as immediate as if he were still working among us today; and where we used to know but a handful of (mostly early) concertos, we are now becoming more aware of different stylistic periods, as well as the cross-fertilisation with other areas of his output.

Three of the works here show affinities with vocal works from the 1720s, when the brusque energy of the L'estro armonico concertos had been left behind in favour of something more dance-like; the other two are in the expansive, laid-back style of the 1730s. It is a little voyage of discovery, then, with the scenery including much harmonic resource and violinistic devilry.

There are no surprises in the performances though: they are as purringly beautiful as ever from these artists. Carmignola dashes around Vivaldi's scampering passagework and giant leaps with an easy control and consistency of good tone, and the Venice Baroque Orchestra are worthy partners - their surging rivers of sound in the finale of RV325 give a real thrill. Indeed, while one can imagine violinists of the Manze or Biondi kind finding more drama or humour in this music, it is otherwise hard to find anything to fault in these Rolls-Royce performances.



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Works Details

>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in G minor, RV 331
  • Performers: Giuliano Carmignola (Violin); Andrea Marcon (Harpsichord)
  • Conductor: Andrea Marcon
  • Ensemble: Venice Baroque Orchestra
  • Running Time: 13 min. 4 sec.
  • Period Time: Baroque
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: by 1742

>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in C major, RV 190
  • Performers: Giuliano Carmignola (Violin); Andrea Marcon (Harpsichord)
  • Conductor: Andrea Marcon
  • Ensemble: Venice Baroque Orchestra
  • Running Time: 14 min. 8 sec.
  • Period Time: Baroque
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: by 1742

>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in G minor, RV 325
  • Performers: Giuliano Carmignola (Violin); Andrea Marcon (Harpsichord)
  • Conductor: Andrea Marcon
  • Ensemble: Venice Baroque Orchestra
  • Running Time: 7 min. 36 sec.
  • Period Time: Baroque
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: by 1742

>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin, strings & continuo in D major, RV 217
  • Performers: Giuliano Carmignola (Violin); Andrea Marcon (Harpsichord)
  • Conductor: Andrea Marcon
  • Ensemble: Venice Baroque Orchestra
  • Running Time: 10 min. 24 sec.
  • Period Time: Baroque
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: by 1742

>Vivaldi, Antonio : Concerto for Violin in G major, RV 303
  • Performers: Giuliano Carmignola (Violin); Andrea Marcon (Harpsichord)
  • Conductor: Andrea Marcon
  • Ensemble: Venice Baroque Orchestra
  • Running Time: 12 min. 20 sec.
  • Period Time: Baroque
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: by 1742