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Kabalevsky: Piano Concerto no 1, etc / Stott, Jarvi, et al

Album Summary

>Kabalevsky, Dmitri : Concerto for Piano no 1 in A minor, Op. 9
>Kabalevsky, Dmitri : Symphony no 2 in C minor, Op. 19
>Kabalevsky, Dmitri : Concerto for Piano no 4 ("Prague"), Op. 99
Performer Conductor Ensemble
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Composer

Notes & Reviews:

Hearing his marvelous 1931 First Piano Concerto on this new Chandos, it's hard to understand why his concertos are so seldom played or recorded. The music overflows with joyous melodies, fluent and idiomatic pianism, perfectly judged harmonic shadings, brilliant interplay of piano and orchestra. It sounds like a sparkling blend of Rachmaninoff and Prokofieff with added touches of Ravel and a hint, sometimes, of English folk-song. The craftsmanship is impeccable, the formal proportions pleasing, the climaxes carried forward by plenty of dazzle and sweep. Listen to the thrilling fourth and fifth variations in II, a glittering scherzo followed by a majestic funeral march." -ARG

Gramophone Classical Music Guide
As the work of a 24-year-old seeking to make his mark, Kabalevsky's First Piano Concerto is unsurprisingly replete with references to the Russian concerto tradition. Yet just as one notes the seemingly blatant echoes of Rachmaninov's Paganini Rhapsody in the slow movement, one realises that the Rhapsody post-dates the Concerto by six years: evidently Rachmaninov was doing the echoing. Moreover, along with the stylistic affinities comes a less predictable tone of wistful introspection and an urge for symphonic consistency, qualities readily attributable to the influence of Kabalevsky's teacher, Myaskovsky.

All this is superbly delineated by Kathryn Stott, completing her outstanding survey of the four Kabalevsky piano concertos with these superbly considered accounts.

Kabalevsky's Second Symphony is again clearly indebted to Myaskovsky. Its relatively conventional layout is capped by a Scherzo that mutates rather neatly into a finale and puts the earnestness of the first two movements firmly behind it. Järvi knocks several minutes off the normal timing of the second and third movements by virtue of a robust, no-nonsense approach.

Stott and Järvi steer the Fourth Concerto home in just under 12 minutes, mainly by taking a less drawn-out approach to the slow movement than in the composer's own recording. In most respects they surpass that unsubtle if disciplined version. Beautifully recorded and executed, the new Chandos disc is self-recommending for collectors of Soviet music and/or 20th-century piano concertos.



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Works Details

>Kabalevsky, Dmitri : Concerto for Piano no 1 in A minor, Op. 9
  • Performer: Kathryn Stott (Piano)
  • Conductor: Neeme Järvi
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (07/06/2005/07/07/2005)
  • Running Time: 20 min. 21 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 1928

>Kabalevsky, Dmitri : Symphony no 2 in C minor, Op. 19
  • Conductor: Neeme Järvi
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (07/06/2005/07/07/2005)
  • Running Time: 24 min. 19 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Orchestral
  • Written: 1934

>Kabalevsky, Dmitri : Concerto for Piano no 4 ("Prague"), Op. 99
  • Performer: Kathryn Stott (Piano)
  • Conductor: Neeme Järvi
  • Notes: Studio 7, New Broadcasting House, Manchester, England (07/06/2005/07/07/2005)
  • Running Time: 11 min. 57 sec.
  • Period Time: Modern
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 1975