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Sergey Lyapunov: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2; Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes

Audio Samples

>Lyapunov, Sergey : Concerto for Piano no 1 in E flat minor, Op. 4
>Lyapunov, Sergey : Concerto for Piano no 2 in E major, Op. 38
>Lyapunov, Sergey : Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes, for piano & orchestra, Op. 28

Album Summary

>Lyapunov, Sergey : Concerto for Piano no 1 in E flat minor, Op. 4
>Lyapunov, Sergey : Concerto for Piano no 2 in E major, Op. 38
>Lyapunov, Sergey : Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes, for piano & orchestra, Op. 28
Performer Conductor Ensemble
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Composer

Notes & Reviews:

Russian Nationalist Sergey Mikhaylovich Lyapunov was strongly influenced by Mily Balakirev, leader of the ‘Mighty Handful’ of composers, to whom he dedicated his Glinka Prize-winning Piano Concerto No. 1. Lyapunov’s Piano Concerto No. 2 deserves a place among the great Romantic piano concertos, while the Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes bears the imprint of Liszt’s virtuosic pianistic style. The young Georgian pianist Shorena Tsintsabadze, a graduate of Moscow’s Tchaikovsky Conservatory, joins the Russian Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Dmitry Yablonsky, whose Naxos discography includes many acclaimed albums of Russian and Romantic repertoire.

”Lyapunov is well-served on disc, if not generously so. This exact coupling is available in Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto series, more vividly recorded (and more expensive), but pianist Shorena Tsintsabadze and Dmitry Yablonsky more than hold their own against the team of Milne and Brabbins on the English label. Tsintsabadze has the digital dexterity to attack these pieces with aplomb, never losing herself (or the tune) in Lyapunov's numerous musical gestures and asides. The Russian Philharmonic is certainly no less accomplished than Hyperion's BBC forces, and while, as just suggested, the sonics are somewhat studio-bound, Tsintsabadze's piano sounds aptly bold and bright. Not great music perhaps, but well worth hearing and very enjoyable all the same.”-Classicstoday.com

"Moscow-born Shorena Tsintsabadze gives direct, well-schooled accounts of all three works" -Gramophone Magazine

"The performances are terrific, with monumental playing from Shorena Tsintsabadze and orchestral contributions of persuasive beauty from the Russian Philharmonic under Dmitry Yablonsky. The filler is the Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes (1907), which is very difficult for the pianist (Tsintsabadze does wonders)" -The Guardian ***

Fanfare
Hamish Milne is a wonderful pianist, but my sense of the several volumes he's recorded for Hyperion's Romantic Piano series is that he's had to learn new scores specifically for the project, scores he may not necessarily have come to on his own or be deeply responsive to. His performances in the highly diverse concertos he's committed to disc - from Hummel to Holbrooke - tend to reflect a certain sameness of approach and a surface playing of the notes that don't always reflect their national origins or stylistic differences.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Studio 5, Russian State TV and Radio Company KULTURA, M (03/02/2008-03/06/2008).



Reviews

Lyapunov piano concertos 1 and 2
Lovers of Russian music frequently think of Glinka, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Rimsky-Korsakov, Musorgsky, and perhaps Borodin, but less well-known composers, such as Arensky, Balakirev, Lyadov, Anton Rubinstein, the Taneyevs and especially Lyapunov are often overlooked. Lyapunov became a disciple of Balakirev, who encouraged him and tried to get his works published. Together with Balakirev and Lyadov, Lyapunov collected some 300 folksongs from the Vologda, Vyatka and Kostroma districts. He concertized extensively in Germany and Austria and also taught in various positions. He emigrated to Paris in 1923 and taught there for one year before succumbing to a fatal heart attack. Lyapunov's two piano concertos are written in a Lisztian style, i.e., each is in a single movement; the various sections flow together with no breaks, and the virtuoso style is prominent. Both concertos are full of melodies, and it is shameful that they are so neglected. The Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes, dedicated to Busoni, is also in the Lisztian style. This budget-priced Naxos CD competes with a full-priced CD that contains the same three works. The young pianist Shorena Tsintsabadze, a native of Moscow despite her Georgian-sounding name, plays splendidly, and the Russian Philharmonic Orchestra, under Dmitry Yablonsky's expert direction, provides excellent accompaniment. The sound quality is first rate, and Keith Anderson's program notes are very informative. Warmly recommended. Ted Wilks
Submitted on 12/20/10 by Ted Wilks 
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Works Details

>Lyapunov, Sergey : Concerto for Piano no 1 in E flat minor, Op. 4
  • Performer: Shorena Tsintsabadze (Piano)
  • Conductor: Dmitry Yablonsky
  • Notes: Studio 5, Russian State TV and Radio Company KULTURA, Moscow, Russia (03/02/2008-03/06/2008)
  • Running Time: 22 min. 22 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Written: 1890

>Lyapunov, Sergey : Concerto for Piano no 2 in E major, Op. 38
  • Performer: Shorena Tsintsabadze (Piano)
  • Conductor: Dmitry Yablonsky
  • Notes: Studio 5, Russian State TV and Radio Company KULTURA, Moscow, Russia (03/02/2008-03/06/2008)
  • Running Time: 19 min. 32 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Form: Concerto
  • Written: 1909

>Lyapunov, Sergey : Rhapsody on Ukrainian Themes, for piano & orchestra, Op. 28
  • Performer: Shorena Tsintsabadze (Piano)
  • Conductor: Dmitry Yablonsky
  • Notes: Studio 5, Russian State TV and Radio Company KULTURA, Moscow, Russia (03/02/2008-03/06/2008)
  • Running Time: 16 min. 35 sec.
  • Period Time: Post Romantic
  • Written: 1907