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James Whitbourne: Living Voices

> Son of God Mass - Introit
> Son of God Mass - Kyrie
> Son of God Mass - Kyrie meditation
> Son of God Mass - Gloria
> Son of God Mass - Lava me
> Son of God Mass - Sanctus and Benedictus
> Son of God Mass - Pax Domini
> Son of God Mass - Agnus Dei
> Son of God Mass - Amen
> Winter's Wait - Winter's Wait
> Give us the wings of faith - Give us the wings of faith
> A brief story of Peter Abelard (verson for soprano saxophone and organ) - A brief story of Peter Abelard (verson for soprano saxophone and organ)
> A Prayer from South Africa - A Prayer from South Africa
> Living Voices - Living Voices
> Requiem canticorum - Introit
> Requiem canticorum - Pie Jesu
> Requiem canticorum - Alleluia
> Requiem canticorum - De profundis
> Requiem canticorum - Lux aeterna
> All shall be Amen and Alleluia - All shall be Amen and Alleluia

Album Summary

>Whitbourn, James : Son of God Mass, devotional concert piece for chorus, saxphone & organ
>Whitbourn, James : Winter's Wait, for chorus & organ
>Whitbourn, James : Give us the wings of faith, for chorus & organ
>Whitbourn, James : A brief story of Peter Abelard, for chorus, saxophone & organ
>Whitbourn, James : A Prayer from South Africa, for chorus
>Whitbourn, James : Living Voices, for narrator, chorus & saxophone
>Whitbourn, James : Requiem canticorum, for chorus, saxophone & organ
>Whitbourn, James : All shall be Amen and Alleluia, for chorus, percussion, piano & organ
Performers Conductor Ensemble Composer

Notes & Reviews:

James Whitbourn is known for his 'boundless breadth of choral imagination' (The Observer) resulting in compositions of brilliance and power. His extraordinary work for choir, saxophone and organ, Son of God Mass, receives a new recording from the young voices of one of Westminster Choir College of Rider University's finest chamber choirs under the leading American choral conductor James Jordan. It is heard alongside a collection of première recordings of other works associated with life and death, including the Requiem canticorum and Living Voices, a work to commemorate the dead of 9/11 with a poem by Andrew Motion.

American Record Guide
The performance quality is excellent.

The Observer
Here's another welcome collection from a truly original communicator in modern British choral music. Whitbourn's interest in the compelling combination of voices and the soprano saxophone dominates here...The Princeton choir is directed by James Jordan with precision and poise

Opera News
The three elements of Whitbourn's timbral tapestry on most of these works - choral voices, organ and soprano sax - blend in fresh and unexpected ways; sometimes it's hard to tell whether a sustained underpinning of sound is the chorus, a subtle stop on the organ or a combination thereof. The Westminster Williamson Voices under conductor James Jordan are alternately vibrant and sensitive, as called for.

Infodad.com
James Whitbourn commemorates the murders on 9/11 in a very different way with a very different work called Living Voices, written the same year that the terrorists struck and lasting just three minutes - and using a poem by Andrew Motion to express the mournfulness of the time. And there are several well-made shorter pieces offered here as well, all of them preoccupied with life, death and the balance between the two - and the faith-based response of the living to the death of loved ones.

Gramophone
undoubtedly... strikingly beautiful... Westminster Williamson Voices is well honed, muscular and rich... A Brief Story of Peter Abelard, is the strongest and most satisfying piece on the disc... Jeremy Powell's saxophone-playing is compelling...

ClassicsToday.com
With the Hilliard Ensemble and Jan Garbarek, in very successful, experimental recording projects for ECM such as Officium and Mnemosyne. Each movement is exceptionally well conceived to suit the mood and meaning of the texts; the final Amen is a marvelous, climactic utterance. The music thrives on the warm, resonant timbre of these 40 well-trained voices and benefits from ensemble balances carefully tuned to texture and to the acoustic of the Princeton University Chapel.

While Whitbourn shows no lack of originality or facility in effectively integrating voices and saxophone in the Mass and Requiem... All are well worth hearing - and repeating. Highly recommended.

BBC Music Magazine
Tonal, tuneful, technically accessible, harmonically palliative: James Whitbourn's music ticks many of the boxes beloved by choral societies...James Jordan directs the Princeton-based choir with grip and sensitivity; he's notably successful in keeping the singers firmly focused throughout all the quiet, restrained music, where concentration and vocal support can so easily weaken.

International Record Review, February 2012
If the opening saxophone solo of Son of God Mass reminds one irresistably of Jan Garbarek and Officium, elsewhere James Whitbourn's music is a mixture of a more directly English transcendental cast that one might associate with Howells, say...performances under the assured direction of James Jordan are outstanding; and saxophonist Jeremy Powell has nothing at all to fear from Garbarek.

The Times
Those enchanted by the mystic minimalism of John Tavener or Henryk Górecki will rejoice to discover a younger exponent of this soporific style. James Whitbourn is a 46-year-old Brit, who writes choral music so sweet and slow that my brain has only just regained consciousness. Yet it's cleverly crafted and beautifully performed by the Westminster Williamson Voices, with lots of vaguely Arabic saxophone melismas by Jeremy Powell.

Notes & Reviews:

Recording information: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011).



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Works Details

>Whitbourn, James : Son of God Mass, devotional concert piece for chorus, saxphone & organ
  • Performers: Jeremy Powell; Ken Cowan (Organ)
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 25 min. 50 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2001

>Whitbourn, James : Winter's Wait, for chorus & organ
  • Performer: Ken Cowan (Organ)
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 4 min. 10 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2010

>Whitbourn, James : Give us the wings of faith, for chorus & organ
  • Performer: Ken Cowan (Organ)
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 2 min. 39 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2002

>Whitbourn, James : A brief story of Peter Abelard, for chorus, saxophone & organ
  • Performers: Jeremy Powell; Ken Cowan (Organ)
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 7 min. 31 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2006-2011

>Whitbourn, James : A Prayer from South Africa, for chorus
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 1 min. 59 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2009

>Whitbourn, James : Living Voices, for narrator, chorus & saxophone
  • Performer: Jeremy Powell
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 3 min. 15 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2001

>Whitbourn, James : Requiem canticorum, for chorus, saxophone & organ
  • Performers: Jeremy Powell; Ken Cowan (Organ)
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 12 min. 48 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Form: Choral
  • Written: 2010

>Whitbourn, James : All shall be Amen and Alleluia, for chorus, percussion, piano & organ
  • Performers: Ken Cowan (Organ); Jonathan Lakeland (Piano); Jacob Ezzo (Percussion)
  • Conductor: James Jordan
  • Ensemble: Westminster Williamson Voices
  • Notes: Princeton University Chapel, Princeton, NJ (04/12/2011-04/14/2011)
  • Running Time: 4 min. 11 sec.
  • Period Time: Contemporary
  • Written: 2009