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Sixpence None the Richer: Lost in Transition [Digipak] *

Audio Samples

>My Dear Machine
>Radio
>Give It Back
>Safety Line
>When You Call Me
>Should Not Be This Hard
>Go Your Way
>Failure
>Don't Blame Yourself
>Stand My Ground
>Sooner Than Later
>Be OK

Track List

>My Dear Machine
>Radio
>Give It Back
>Safety Line
>When You Call Me
>Should Not Be This Hard
>Go Your Way
>Failure
>Don't Blame Yourself
>Stand My Ground
>Sooner Than Later
>Be OK

Album Notes

Personnel: Leigh Nash (vocals); Matt Slocum (guitar, cello); Greg Leisz (lap steel guitar); Justin Cary (baritone guitar); Cason Cooley (keyboards); Will Sayles (drums, percussion); Jim Scott (percussion).

Audio Mixer: Jim Scott .

Recording information: Plyrz Studio.

Sixpence None the Richer disbanded in 2004, and its two central figures -- guitarist/songwriter Matt Slocum and singer/songwriter Leigh Nash -- pursued other projects and solo albums for a few years. In 2007, Nash and Slocum reunited and began working on new songs, five of which were released as the My Dear Machine EP in 2008. Four of those songs now appear on Lost in Transition, the band's first full-length album since its breakup. Working with producer Jim Scott, whose alt-pop and alt-country credentials are pure gold, Sixpence None the Richer have here created what may be the most richly textured and fully realized album of their career; songs like "Safety Line" and "Should Not Be This Hard" are both brilliantly structured and emotionally complex, while "Give It Back" and "When You Call Me" continue the exploration of themes related to Christian faith that have been at the core of Sixpence None the Richer's mission since the band's earliest days. Nash's voice has strengthened as she's gotten older; the breathy warble is still there, but there's a grainier edge to it, and she wields it with more confidence and power. And she and Slocum have evolved into a truly top-notch songwriting team, his seemingly bottomless bag of guitar tricks propel the songs forward with both grace and power. Those looking for another "Kiss Me" may be disappointed by Lost in Transition, but if you want mature songcraft, there's plenty of it to be found on this richly rewarding album. ~ Rick Anderson



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