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Grandfather Child: Grandfather Child [Digipak]

Audio Samples

>Can't Seem to Forget
>...Gonna Have Ourselves a Vision
>Magical Words
>New Orleans
>I Would Like to Thank the Universe/Planet Earth
>Across Our Minds
>Waiting for You
>Ride That Train
>It Shines On

Track List

>Can't Seem to Forget
>...Gonna Have Ourselves a Vision
>Magical Words
>New Orleans
>I Would Like to Thank the Universe/Planet Earth
>Across Our Minds
>Waiting for You
>Ride That Train
>It Shines On

Album Notes

Houston's Grandfather Child had their beginnings in 2009 when Lucas Gorham, who was then playing with the punk rock band Satin Hooks, saw a documentary film about gospel music called Sacred Steel. Gorham was struck by the sound and energy of the lap steel guitar, an instrument Robert Randolph was just starting to bring to the public's eye. Gorham left his band, taught himself how to play lap steel, began writing secular songs that reflected a sacred steel electric gospel sound, and enlisted the help of three of Houston's top players, drummer Ryan Chavez along with Robert Ellis and Geoffrey Muller on bass and guitar, to form Grandfather Child. Mixing electric gospel with country, blues, R&B, funk, and soul, and a good deal of Gorham's amazing electric lap steel playing, Grandfather Child quickly developed into a dynamite live band, shifting and sliding through all sorts of jams, secular church shuffles, boogies, and smooth-as-silk urban R&B, going all over the map with a jubilant confidence. That same eclectic, elastic versatility is tough to capture in the studio, though, and their self-titled debut album on New West Records exhibits this. Gorham is a fine lead singer, and his lap steel playing is this band's signature, but he sings two very different types of songs here, the gutbucket secular gospel blues shouters like "...Gonna Have Ourselves a Vision" and "Ride That Train," which roar and growl with furious energy, and smooth urban R&B ballads like "Can't Seem to Forget," which shimmer with dream pop background vocals and swooning arrangements and rhythms. Gorham sings both styles very well, and both work with this band, but it's almost as if he has two completely different voices, and the mix of the two on this album gives it an up-and-down, spin-and-turn feel that keeps this set from, well, settling in. When it does get into a consistent groove, though, the album takes off because this is a great new band with an exciting future built on its own sturdy and jubilant roots. ~ Steve Leggett



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