The Rolling Stones: Singles Collection: London Years [SHM]

Track List

Album Reviews:

Entertainment Weekly (9/20/02, p.104) - "...A triple disc that has all the recognizable hits along with must-own obscurities..." - Rating: A-

NME (Magazine) (7/8/95, p.46) - 10 (out of 10) - "...indispensable..."

Album Notes

The Rolling Stones: Mick Jagger (vocals, harmonica, percussion); Keith Richards (vocals, guitar, keyboards); Bill Wyman (vocals, bass); Brian Jones (guitar, harmonica, organ, marimba, sitar, dulcimer, recorder, bells, saxophone, harpsichord, Mellotron, background vocals); Mick Taylor, Ron Wood (guitar); Charlie Watts (drums, percussion).

Additional personnel includes: Joe Moretti (guitar); Ian Stewart (piano, organ); Reg Guest (piano); Nicky Hopkins, Jack Nitzsche (keyboards); Eric Ford (bass); Jimmy Miller (drums); Rocky Dijon (percussion); The London Bach Choir, Madelaine Bell, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Nanette Newman (background vocals); Gene Pitney, Phil Spector, Steve Marriott, Doris Troy, Al Kooper, Ry Cooder, Andy White.

Producers: Andrew Oldham, Eric Easton, The Rolling Stones, Jimmy Miller, Jack Nitzsche.

Engineers include: Roger Savage, Ron Malo, Dave Hassinger.

THE SINGLES COLLECTION: THE LONDON YEARS comes as advertised--the box includes every American and British A-side and B-side the Rolling Stones released between 1963 and 1971 (after which the band began releasing discs under the Rolling Stones Records imprint). The fantastic speed and scope of the Stones' early artistic development have few parallels in popular music, and this collection not only details that incredible process, but serves as a microcosm of '60s pop culture as well.

From the down-and-dirty Chicago-style blues and R&B of the group's early covers (Chuck Berry's "Come On," Willie Dixon's "I Just Wanna Make Love to You") to the dreamy chamber pop of "Lady Jane" and the proto-hard rock of "Street Fightin' Man," the band was always on the cutting edge, both reacting to and anticipating cultural and musical trends. One listen to this box, however, reveals that, unlike the Beatles, the Stones seldom veered far from their roots, always injecting a vital dose of raw sexuality and pure rock & roll spirit into even the boldest of experiments.



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