Marty Ehrlich: Light at the Crossroads

Audio Samples

>Texas
>I Don't Know This World Without Don Cherry
>What I Lost
>Ask Me Later
>Dark Sestina
>Hopeless
>Twos
>April 4
>Light at the Crossroads

Track List

>Texas
>I Don't Know This World Without Don Cherry
>What I Lost
>Ask Me Later
>Dark Sestina
>Hopeless
>Twos
>April 4
>Light at the Crossroads

Album Reviews:

Down Beat (9/97, p.40) - 4 1/2 stars (out of 5) - "...it's simply a smart session of original tunes played beautifully....Ehrlich and Goldberg suggest other potentialities stowed away in the black horn..."

JazzTimes (9/97, p.93) - "...Ehrlich and Goldberg prove to be very complimentary talents, both as players and writers....Their fluency in a variety of contexts, their tag team-like interplay, and their ability to muscle the music into overdrive, are consistently impressive."

Option (9-10/97, p.94) - "...Together, they form a rare, beautifully lyrical two-clarinet front line, playin music that's carefully crafted and delicately rhapsodic....The voices are well-balanced, thoughtful, soft-spoken; the compostions expansive, heart-felt, and warmly mathematical."

Album Notes

Personnel includes: Marty Ehrlich, Ben Goldberg (clarinet, bass clarinet); Trevor Dunn (bass); Kenny Wollesen (drums).

Personnel: Marty Ehrlich (flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, soprano saxophone, alto saxophone); Ben Goldberg (clarinet, bass clarinet); Kenny Wollesen (bugle, drums).

Recording information: Tedesco Studios, Paramus, NJ (01/20/1996-01/21/1996).

Photographer: Robert Adams.

This is a delightful quartet, co-lead by Marty Ehrlich and Ben Goldberg, both of whom here play either clarinet or bass clarinet. Rounded out with a solid and supple rhythm section, the set features four compositions by each of the leaders, along with an arrangement of Wayne Horvitz's "Ask Me Later" (which slyly plays with Thelonious Monk characteristics). The deeply resonant wooden timbre of the reed instruments are equally adept at bringing force and joy to raucously propulsive numbers, as well as languid atmospherics to the more introspective pieces (such as Ehrlich's "Dark Sestina"). Goldberg's work within the klezmer tradition also brings an element of spiritual heritage and folk dancing to some of the proceedings. This is a bracing and successful pairing of two of their generations finest clarinetists.



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